US Crop Planting Resumes Despite Wet Weather

US Crop Watch producers resumed planting corn and soybeans after midweek weather delays, with 16 of 22 fields planted as of May 13. Iowa farmers made significant progress over the weekend, with planting activity described as "fast and even frantic.

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Nitish Verma
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US Crop Planting Resumes Despite Wet Weather

US Crop Planting Resumes Despite Wet Weather

Despite wet midweek weather, most US Crop Watch producers resumed planting corn and soybeans big, things, today, may last week, with 16 of 22 fields planted as of May 13. Iowa producers made significant progress over the weekend, with planting activity described as "fast and even frantic."

Why this matters: The progress of crop planting has significant implications for food security and the overall economy, as corn and soybeans are staple crops in the US. Delays or disruptions to planting can lead to price fluctuations and affect the livelihoods of farmers and consumers alike.

Four of the 11 producers reported zero to one day of fieldwork planting, progress last week, while at least four others ran between two and three days. The North Dakota corn field was in progress on Monday, marking the second-earliest plant date in seven years for that field.

As of Monday, 16 of the 22 fields have been planted, with the Ohio field being the only corn field awaiting planting. The remaining five fields are soybeans, with at least two expected to be started by late week. US forecasters predict the week's heaviest rains could stretch from eastern Kansas through Ohio, with totals between 1 and 2 inches. Widespread wet weather could return across the Corn Belt next week.

crop, watch, last, week, rains, limit, pace The US Department of Agriculture will publish planting progress as of May 12 on Monday afternoon. Analysts peg the May 12 pace for corn at 49% and for soybeans at 39%. The 2024 Crop Watch fields include locations in Kingsbury, South Dakota; Freeborn, Minnesota; Burt, Nebraska; Rice, Kansas; Audubon, Iowa; Cedar, Iowa; Warren, Illinois; Crawford, Illinois; Tippecanoe, Indiana; Fairfield, Ohio; Griggs, North Dakota (soybeans); and Stutsman, North Dakota (corn).

The recent rainfall has also helped eliminate extreme drought conditions in Iowa for the first time in almost two years. According to the latest U.S. Drought Monitor, only 37% of the state is now covered in abnormal to severe levels of drought, down from 97% in September. The past week saw over two inches of precipitation in Iowa, bringing much-needed relief to pastures, crops, and livestock.

While the wet weather has caused some daily, bring, rain, us planting delays, Iowa farmer Mike Brelsford emphasizes the importance of the rainfall. "I don't think there's any farmer that's complaining that they're not done planting because if you don't have rain, you don't have much potential for a crop," extreme, drought, eliminated, recent, rains, delay said Brelsford, who has received about 3.5 inches of rain over the last two weeks on his 6,000-acre farm. "We have to have rain."

As US producers continue making progress in the fields between rain events, all eyes will be on the weather forecast and upcoming USDA reports for the latest updates on planting progress and crop conditions. The consistent rains are expected to be favorable for crops already in the ground, but additional wet weather could pose challenges for farmers still working to get seeds in the ground.

Key Takeaways

  • 16 of 22 US Crop Watch fields planted as of May 13, with Iowa making significant progress.
  • Corn and soybean planting progress affects food security and the overall economy.
  • Wet weather expected to continue, with 1-2 inches of rain forecasted for eastern Kansas to Ohio.
  • USDA to publish planting progress report on May 12, with analysts predicting 49% corn and 39% soybean progress.
  • Recent rainfall eliminates extreme drought conditions in Iowa, bringing relief to crops and livestock.