Amnesty Warns of Threats to Indigenous Rights in Biodiversity Framework

Amnesty International raises concerns about indigenous peoples' rights in the Global Biodiversity Framework, citing lack of consultation and consent. The framework aims to halt biodiversity loss by 2030, but may not prioritize indigenous rights, sparking concerns about ineffective conservation strategies.

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Nitish Verma
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Amnesty Warns of Threats to Indigenous Rights in Biodiversity Framework

Amnesty Warns of Threats to Indigenous Rights in Biodiversity Framework

Amnesty International has raised concerns about potential threats to the rights of indigenous peoples in the recently adopted success, part Global Biodiversity Framework. The human rights organization cites a lack of consultation and consent from indigenous communities in the development and implementation of biodiversity monitoring initiatives as a key issue.

Why this matters: The rights of indigenous peoples are crucial to addressing biodiversity loss, as they are often the most affected by conservation efforts and have valuable knowledge to share. Ignoring their rights and participation could lead to ineffective conservation strategies and further marginalization of indigenous communities.

The Global Biodiversity Framework, adopted at the UN Biodiversity Conference (COP15) in Montreal in December 2022, aims to halt and reverse biodiversity loss by 2030. It includes 23 targets to support this overall goal. However, Amnesty International argues that the framework may not adequately prioritize the rights of indigenous peoples, who are often the most affected by biodiversity loss and conservation efforts.

In parallel to the Global Biodiversity Framework, the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD) has released its recommendations for businesses to report on their impacts, dependencies, risks, and opportunities related to nature. The TNFD framework includes 14 recommended disclosures aligned with the Taskforce on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) framework.

While the TNFD has started as a voluntary framework, it is anticipated that many jurisdictions will incorporate its recommended disclosures into local regulatory reporting schemes or mandate TNFD reporting. The European Sustainability Reporting Standards (ESRS) are the first to mandate nature-related reporting for companies with operations in the EU, with standards fully aligned to the TNFD's 14 recommended disclosures.

Sam Duckworth, an author and advocate for the outdoors, emphasizes the importance of ecosystem services, stating, "Time spent outdoors is both made possible and enhanced by the quality of ecosystem services in those environments, those essential benefits that a functioning ecosystem provides to humans." This underscores the critical role that biodiversity plays in supporting human well-being and the need for inclusive conservation efforts.

As the world grapples with the urgent need to address biodiversity loss, Amnesty International's warning serves as a reminder that the rights and participation of indigenous peoples must be central to any global biodiversity framework. The organization calls for greater consultation, consent, and prioritization of indigenous rights in the development and implementation of biodiversity monitoring and conservation initiatives moving forward.

Key Takeaways

  • Amnesty International raises concerns about indigenous rights in Global Biodiversity Framework.
  • Lack of consultation and consent from indigenous communities threatens their rights.
  • Indigenous peoples' participation is crucial for effective biodiversity conservation.
  • TNFD framework recommends nature-related reporting for businesses to mitigate biodiversity loss.
  • Inclusive conservation efforts must prioritize indigenous rights and participation.