Diane Tuft's 'Entropy' Captures Climate Change Impact on Coastal Beauty

Environmental photographer Diane Tuft's new book "Entropy" showcases the devastating effects of climate change on coastal communities and oceans through photographs and essays. The book features images from six diverse locations, including Bangladesh's Kolatoli Beach, highlighting the vulnerability of these ecosystems.

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Bijay Laxmi
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Diane Tuft's 'Entropy' Captures Climate Change Impact on Coastal Beauty

Diane Tuft's 'Entropy' Captures Climate Change Impact on Coastal Beauty

Environmental photographer Diane Tuft's new book "Entropy" showcases the devastating effects of climate change on coastal communities and the fading splendor of the world's oceans and lakes. The book features photographs from six diverse locations, including Bangladesh's Kolatoli Beach, accompanied by poems and essays from experts.

Why this matters: Climate change is having a profound impact on coastal ecosystems and the communities that depend on them, with rising sea levels and increased storm frequency threatening the very existence of these areas. As the effects of climate change continue to escalate, it is essential that we raise awareness and take action to mitigate its impacts and protect these vulnerableecosystems.

Tuft's striking images, captured through close-up and aerial photography, aim to engage art lovers in conversations about the urgent issue of climate change and its impact on fragile coastal environments. "Water is the perfect example of this. Its molecular structure is chaotic and shifting all the time, from frozen to liquid to vapor. So for me, entropy in this book is all about the changing of water," Tuft explains.

Among the photographs featured in "Entropy" is an image of sand bubbler crabs on Kolatoli Beach in Bangladesh. These centimeter-wide crustaceans emerge from underground during low tide to eat plankton and spit up bubbles of sandy leftovers. Tuft's photograph highlights the vulnerability of thesecreatures' habitatas sea levels continue to rise due to climate change.

Tuft's passion for nature and photography began in her childhood. "I grew up pretty poor and didn't have any toys, and so my toys were nature. I'd go outside and play with sticks and stones in the river and create little art installations," she recalls. After pursuing a career in mathematics and computer science, Tuft rediscovered her love for art and photography when her youngest daughter turned 15.

In addition to Bangladesh, "Entropy" features photographs from the Great Salt Lake in Utah, which sits 4,200 feet above sea level, making it unusually close to the sun and prone to absorbing ultraviolet light. This unique environmental condition sparked Tuft's interest in documenting the effects of climate change through her photography.

"Entropy" also includes images from the Florida Keys, Chesapeake Bay, and atoll nations in the Pacific Ocean. The book features contributions from Westminster University biology professor Bonnie Baxter and artist Stacey Epstein, providing scientific and artistic perspectives on the environmental issues captured in Tuft's photographs.

Diane Tuft's "Entropy" serves as a powerful visual testament to the devastating impact of climate change on the world's coastal communities and the vanishing beauty of our oceans and lakes. Through her lens, Tuft invites readers to confront the urgent need for action to protect these fragileecosystemsbefore they are lost forever.