Studies Show Shared Mobility Can Significantly Reduce Transport Emissions

The article highlights the potential of promoting shared taxis, car-sharing, and ridesharing to reduce CO2 emissions in the transport sector, as demonstrated by two recent studies by the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC), which found that pooled mobility can play a crucial role in achieving climate neutrality, particularly in urban areas with high density and in the global South where shared transportation is already widespread." This description focuses on the primary topic of reducing CO2 emissions through shared mobility, the main entity of the MCC research institute, the context of urban areas and the global South, and the significant action of promoting pooled mobility to achieve climate neutrality. The description also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as depicting urban landscapes with shared transportation modes, or illustrating the concept of pooled mobility in the global South.

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Studies Show Shared Mobility Can Significantly Reduce Transport Emissions

Studies Show Shared Mobility Can Significantly Reduce Transport Emissions

Two recent studies by the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) highlight the significant potential of promoting shared taxis, car-sharing, and ridesharing to reduce CO2 emissions in the transport sector. The studies, published in Environmental Research Letters and Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, demonstrate that pooled mobility can play a crucial role in achieving climate neutrality.

Why this matters: As the world grapples with the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the findings of these studies offer a promising path forward in the transport sector, which is a significant contributor to global emissions. Implementing shared mobility solutions can have a substantial impact on mitigating climate change, with far-reaching benefits for the environment, public health, and the economy.

The first study, which analyzed the topic from nine different perspectives, found that the success of pooled mobility depends on various factors, including political management of traffic, local economy, and urban planning. "Overall, the aim is to recognise the increased pooling of car journeys as an innovation with both social and technical implications, and to scientifically explore it," explains Felix Creutzig, head of the MCC working group Land Use, Infrastructure and Transport.

The study emphasizes the importance of urban density and urban form for pooled mobility, citing New York and Beijing as examples with great potential. In the global South, where fewer people can afford their own cars, pooled mobility solutions are already widespread, offering an opportunity for governments to combine climate protection with economic development.

The second study focused on China, the world's largest greenhouse gas emitter, and calculated the climate effect of pooled mobility in the country. The researchers found that if all road transport is switched to pooled mobility by 2060, CO2 emissions could be reduced by an impressive 83%, compared to a 71% reduction if only electric vehicles are used.

The research team, which included experts from various disciplines such as psychology, energy policy, and urban planning, highlights the importance of policy measures to promote pooled mobility. These measures include infrastructure development, financial incentives, and taxation. "This is a relevant building block on the way to climate neutrality in transport," Creutzig adds, noting that the topic is likely to receive increased attention from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

The studies also point to the global South as a region with great potential for innovation in pooled mobility, with examples such as Ghana and Tanzania already having high levels of shared transportation. The researchers suggest that the North can learn from these innovations, as governments in the global South have the opportunity to combine climate protection with economic development by investing in clean and safe pooled mobility services.

As countries worldwide grapple with the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the effects of climate change, the findings of these studies offer a promising path forward. By promoting shared taxis, car-sharing, and ridesharing, governments and policymakers can significantly reduce CO2 emissions in the transport sector, contributing to the global effort to achieve climate neutrality.

Key Takeaways

  • Pooled mobility can reduce CO2 emissions in transport sector.
  • Urban density and planning crucial for successful pooled mobility.
  • Pooled mobility can reduce China's CO2 emissions by 83% by 2060.
  • Policy measures like infrastructure development and incentives are key.
  • Global South has great potential for innovation in pooled mobility.