3D-Printed Middle Ear Phantom and Prosthesis Advance Otosurgical Training

3D-printed middle ear phantom and PORP enhance low-threshold ossiculoplasty training for otosurgeons and ORL-HNS residents, advancing surgical education and skill development.

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Justice Nwafor
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3D-Printed Middle Ear Phantom and Prosthesis Advance Otosurgical Training

3D-Printed Middle Ear Phantom and Prosthesis Advance Otosurgical Training

A new study has developed a 3D-printed middle ear phantom and partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP) to enhance low-threshold ossiculoplasty training for otosurgeons and otolaryngology head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) residents. The 3D models, generated from micro-CT imaging of a cadaveric temporal bone, were printed using transparent photopolymers to create realistic training tools.

Ten otosurgeons and ten ORL-HNS residents participated in an ossiculoplasty simulation using the 3D-printed phantom and PORP. The participants successfully drilled, scooped, and placed the 3D-printed PORP, providing feedback on the phantom's realistic maneuverability. While some ORL-HNS residents criticized the haptic feedback during drilling and scooping, both groups expressed optimism about the application of these 3D-printed models as training tools.

Why this matters: The integration of 3D-printed models in conventional otosurgical training holds significant promise for advancing surgical education and skill development. By providing low-threshold, accessible training tools, this innovation could improve the quality and accessibility of otosurgical training worldwide.

The researchers concluded that the 3D-printed middle ear phantom and PORP can be effectively used for low-threshold training in the future. The successful development and testing of these 3D-printed models mark an important step forward in otosurgical education, offering realistic and accessible training opportunities for both experienced surgeons and residents.

Key Takeaways

  • 3D-printed middle ear phantom and PORP developed for otosurgery training
  • Tested by 10 otosurgeons and 10 ORL-HNS residents, providing realistic feedback
  • 3D models generated from micro-CT imaging of cadaveric temporal bone
  • 3D-printed models promise to advance surgical education and skill development
  • Successful development marks important step in accessible otosurgical training