New York Times Opinion Calls for Reforming Classroom Technology Use

Rethinking ed-tech: A call to prioritize student well-being and learning over tech company interests in K-12 classrooms.

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New York Times Opinion Calls for Reforming Classroom Technology Use

New York Times Opinion Calls for Reforming Classroom Technology Use

Jessica Grose, a writer for the New York Times opinion newsletter, recently called for a reevaluation and reform of technology use in K-12 classrooms. In her article, Grose argues that the proliferation of educational technology has become a "wicked problem" with many interconnected parts that require holistic and flexible solutions.

Grose spoke with various interested parties, including parents, teachers, administrators, and academics, and found that while there are benefits to using technology in the classroom, the current approach is problematic. "Technology use in schools should be driven by educators, not tech companies," Grose writes. She suggests that districts and schools should first determine what technology would be most useful for their students based on available data and teacher experience, rather than simply adopting free or cheap products provided by tech companies.

Why this matters: The use of technology in education has far-reaching implications for student learning, well-being, and future success. Reforming the way technology is evaluated and implemented in classrooms is vital to ensure that it effectively supports and enhances the learning experience for all students.

The article emphasizes the need for a complete rethink of the ways technology is evaluated and used in classrooms to prioritize student well-being and connectedness. Grose's call for reform comes amidst other education-related topics, such as changes to the SAT exam, book censorship, and efforts to overhaul how children learn to read, known as the "science of reading movement."

Grose's article highlights the importance of addressing literacy challenges and promoting effective teaching methods to support student skills. "We need to ask better questions about what kinds of technology work for both teachers and students," Grose concludes, emphasizing the need for a collaborative and thoughtful approach to integrating technology in the classroom.

Key Takeaways

  • Calls for reevaluation and reform of tech use in K-12 classrooms
  • Tech use should be driven by educators, not tech companies
  • Importance of addressing literacy challenges and effective teaching methods
  • Need for collaborative and thoughtful approach to integrating classroom tech
  • Highlights far-reaching implications of tech use for student learning and well-being