House Passes $95 Billion Foreign Aid Package Amid GOP Divide, Border Security Debate

The U.S. House approves a $95B foreign aid package for Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan, sparking debate within the GOP over priorities and party unity.

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Bijay Laxmi
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House Passes $95 Billion Foreign Aid Package Amid GOP Divide, Border Security Debate

House Passes $95 Billion Foreign Aid Package Amid GOP Divide, Border Security Debate

The U.S. House of Representatives has approved a $95 billion foreign aid package that includes military assistance for Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan, as well as humanitarian aid for Gaza and other war zones. The legislation, proposed by Speaker Mike Johnson (R-La.), attempts to balance the demands of conservatives and Democrats by splitting the package into four separate votes.

Rep. Nancy Mace (R-S.C.) criticized Congress for not including a border security bill in the foreign aid legislation. "The American people have every right to be angry," Mace said. A separate border security bill, the End the Border Catastrophe Act, failed to pass in the House.

The aid package includes $61 billion for Ukraine, $26 billion for Israel, and $8 billion for allies in the Indo-Pacific, including Taiwan. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky expressed gratitude for the aid, saying it will save thousands of lives and prevent the war from expanding.

The passage of the foreign aid bills marked a moral victory for Speaker Johnson, but it also provoked conservatives who were already frustrated with his penchant for reaching across the aisle to work with President Biden on major legislation. Some Republicans, including Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.), have called for Johnson's ouster.

Why this matters: The passage of the foreign aid package highlights the ongoing debate within the Republican party over priorities and the balance between domestic and international issues. It also underscores the challenges faced by House leadership in navigating competing demands and maintaining party unity.

The bills will now head to the Senate for approval before being signed into law by President Biden. While the aid is expected to pass, the future of continued U.S. support for Ukraine and other allies remains uncertain as Republicans gain more power in Congress and potentially take back the White House in the upcoming elections.

Key Takeaways

  • U.S. House approves $95B foreign aid package for Ukraine, Israel, Taiwan
  • Package splits into 4 votes to balance conservative and Democratic demands
  • Rep. Mace criticizes lack of border security bill, GOP infighting over priorities
  • Aid package includes $61B for Ukraine, $26B for Israel, $8B for Indo-Pacific
  • Future of U.S. support uncertain as Republicans gain power in Congress