Endovascular Treatments Equally Effective for Women and Men with PAD, Study Finds

A study presented at the SCAI annual meeting found that minimally invasive endovascular treatments are equally effective for women and men in treating peripheral artery disease. The study followed 639 patients and found no differences in outcomes based on sex, with endovascular procedures emerging as less risky overall.

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Endovascular Treatments Equally Effective for Women and Men with PAD, Study Finds

Endovascular Treatments Equally Effective for Women and Men with PAD, Study Finds

Astudypresented at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography & Interventions (SCAI) annual meeting in Long Beach, California, reveals that minimally invasive endovascular treatments, including angioplasty and stenting, provide equal benefits for both women and men in treating peripheral artery disease (PAD). The findings offer vital evidence to inform treatment decisions for the millions of Americans impacted by this common and debilitating condition.

Why this matters: This study's results have significant implications for the treatment of PAD, a disease that affects about 1 in 20 Americans over the age of 50, and can lead to severe complications if left untreated. By demonstrating the equal effectiveness of endovascular treatments for both women and men, this research can improve healthcare outcomes and quality of life for millions of people.

The study, led by Dr. Serdar Farhan of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, followed 639 patients who underwent either endovascular procedures or bypass surgeries for PAD. Women accounted for 29% of the participants. Researchers measured the primary outcome, which was a combination of death, major amputation, or the need for a repeat procedure on the same limb two years after surgery.

Notably, the researchers found "no differences" in these outcomes based on the sex of the patients. Angioplasty and stenting emerged asless riskyoverall compared to bypass surgery. Women who had endovascular procedures experienced a 9% complication rate, while those who underwent bypass had a 26% complication rate. Additionally, both women and men had shorter hospital stays following endovascular treatments.

The implications of the study are significant, considering that PAD affects about 1 in 20 Americans over the age of 50, according to the National Institutes of Health. Despite the widespread nature of the disease, research into optimal treatments for women with PAD has been insufficient. Dr. Dr. Farhan emphasized, "While the findings of the study are of value considering the scarce data on PAD treatment in women, they also serve as a strong warning that we must do better in enrolling women in PAD trials."

Dr. Farhan further underscored the necessity for dedicated efforts to ensure adequate representation of women in PAD trials, stating,"Women remain underrepresented in PAD trials, and concerted efforts are warranted to improve our understanding of the disease and its management in both women and men. Addressing this disparity is crucial, as untreated PAD can result in pain, walking difficulties, sores on the legs and feet, and even amputation.

The study's findings offer valuable guidance for doctors and patients in making informed treatment choices. Dr. George Dangas, SCAI president, noted, "Evidence-based data on treatment outcomes for all patients are critically important for individualized care." By showing that minimally invasive endovascular treatments are equally effective for both women and men, the study contributes to advancing the care of PAD patients and enhancing their quality of life.

As researchers shed light on the outcomes of various interventions and highlight the importance of including more women in clinical trials, they are laying the groundwork for more effective and personalized care for all patients affected by PAD. Studies like this serve as vital steps forward in the ongoing effort to better understand and treat this debilitating disease.

Key Takeaways

  • Minimally invasive endovascular treatments are equally effective for women and men with PAD.
  • Angioplasty and stenting have lower complication rates compared to bypass surgery.
  • Women who underwent endovascular procedures had a 9% complication rate, vs. 26% for bypass surgery.
  • Both women and men had shorter hospital stays following endovascular treatments.
  • More women need to be enrolled in PAD trials to ensure adequate representation and understanding of the disease.