One in Three UK Girls Missing School Due to Intense Period Pains, Report Reveals

A new report reveals that 1 in 3 girls in the UK miss school due to debilitating period pains, highlighting the urgent need for better education, support, and recognition of menstrual health issues.

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One in Three UK Girls Missing School Due to Intense Period Pains, Report Reveals

One in Three UK Girls Missing School Due to Intense Period Pains, Report Reveals

A new report has revealed that one in three girls in the United Kingdom are missing school due to intense period pains, highlighting the ongoing issue of menstrual health and its impact on education. The survey, conducted by the charity Wellbeing Of Women and Censuswide, polled over 3,000 girls and young women aged 12 to 18 and found that 36% are missing school due to incapacitating menstrual symptoms.

According to the report, 43% of respondents said their periods left them unable to eat or sleep, while 92% had to change their daily activities due to heavy bleeding. Zaynah Ahmed, who was diagnosed with adenomyosis and endometriosis, shared her experience of overwhelming period pains by the age of 16, causing her to miss an entire week of school each month.

Experts caution that "all too often" girls and women are living with "incapacitating symptoms" related to their periods, which are frequently dismissed as less serious than other conditions. The survey found that 11% of respondents felt their period pains made them feel like life wasn't worth living.

Why this matters: The report sheds light on the significant impact of menstrual health on girls' education and overall well-being. It emphasizes the need for better education, support, and recognition of period-related issues to ensure that girls and women can fully participate in their daily lives without being hindered by incapacitating symptoms.

Campaigners are calling for better education, a public health campaign on menstrual health, and routine questioning of women and girls about their periods during health checks. The Minister for Women's Health, Maria Caulfield, acknowledged that women and girls should not have to suffer in silence and said the government is working to improve information and support, including easier access to contraception. "Women and girls should not have to suffer in silence, and I encourage anyone worried about their symptoms to come forward and speak to a healthcare professional," Caulfield stated.

Key Takeaways

  • 1 in 3 girls in the UK miss school due to severe period pains.
  • 43% of girls say periods leave them unable to eat or sleep.
  • 92% of girls have to change daily activities due to heavy bleeding.
  • 11% of girls feel life isn't worth living due to period pains.
  • Calls for better education, support, and access to contraception.