Study Links Eating Habits to Body Composition in People with Disabilities

A recent study found that dietary habits affect body composition in physically active individuals with disabilities, with differences in food consumption linked to variations in body fat, muscle mass, and other metrics. The study identified specific foods associated with healthy or unhealthy body composition in both individuals with disabilities and those without.

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Momen Zellmi
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Study Links Eating Habits to Body Composition in People with Disabilities

Study Links Eating Habits to Body Composition in People with Disabilities

A recent study published in Scientific Reports has shed light on the relationship between dietary habits and body composition among physically active individuals with disabilities. The research, which included 55 participants aged 16-61, found that frequent consumption of certain foods was associated with differences in key body composition metrics.

Why this matters: This study's findings have significant implications for the health and well-being of individuals with disabilities, highlighting the importance of tailored nutrition plans to support their unique needs. By understanding the correlation between diet and body composition, healthcare professionals can develop more effective strategies to promote healthy living and reduce the risk of chronic diseases in this population.

The study revealed that participants with disabilities exhibited higher body fat, metabolic age, and pulse values compared to the control group of individuals without disabilities. Conversely, the control group showed higher muscle mass, muscle quality, body type, and bone mass. Interestingly, no significant differences in body mass index (BMI) were observed between the two groups.

The researchers found that individuals with disabilities were more likely to consume vegetables (p = 0.004) and animal fats (p = 0.027), while those without disabilities were more inclined to consume fast food, instant products (p = 0.006), sweetened beverages (p = 0.001), and alcohol (p = 0.001). These dietary differences were linked to variations in body composition metrics between the two groups.

Among people without disabilities, frequent consumption of eggs, animal fats, sugar, and sweets was associated with higher BMI, body fat, and visceral fat. In contrast, for individuals with disabilities, the study cautioned against the consumption of processed fruits, dried fruits, fast food, and red meat, as they often have a higher percentage of body fat.

On a positive note, the study found that frequent consumption of fruit was associated with higher basal metabolic rate and muscle mass in both groups. This highlights the importance of including fruits as part of a balanced diet for maintaining healthy body composition.

The study utilized the FFQ-6 questionnaire, Tanita body composition analyzer, and Stadiometer to assess dietary habits and body composition. Participants were physically active, with the study group consisting of individuals with musculoskeletal diseases and developmental and mental disorders who regularly trained in Frame Running. The control group was matched to the study group in terms of age, gender, and amount of physical activity.

The findings underscore the significance of nutrition in maintaining bodily homeostasis, especially for physically active individuals with disabilities. The study suggests that people with disabilities should focus on consuming a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables while limiting processed foods and animal fats. Meanwhile, those without disabilities should be mindful of their intake of eggs, animal fats, sugar, and sweets to maintainhealthy body composition.

Key Takeaways

  • Physically active individuals with disabilities have higher body fat and metabolic age than those without disabilities.
  • Dietary habits differ between individuals with and without disabilities, affecting body composition.
  • Frequent fruit consumption is associated with higher basal metabolic rate and muscle mass in both groups.
  • Individuals with disabilities should limit processed foods and animal fats, while those without disabilities should limit eggs, sugar, and sweets.
  • Tailored nutrition plans are crucial for promoting healthy living and reducing chronic disease risk in individuals with disabilities.