Chibok Schoolgirls Demand Justice and Support 10 Years After Boko Haram Abduction

Two Chibok schoolgirl kidnapping survivors, Dinah Lawan and Grace Dauda, speak out about their struggles 10 years after their abduction by Boko Haram. They demand justice and support from the Nigerian government, highlighting the need for comprehensive resources to rebuild their lives.

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Nasiru Eneji Abdulrasheed
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Chibok Schoolgirls Demand Justice and Support 10 Years After Boko Haram Abduction

Chibok Schoolgirls Demand Justice and Support 10 Years After Boko Haram Abduction

Ten years after their abduction by Boko Haram militants, two survivors of the Chibok schoolgirl kidnapping, Dinah Lawan and Grace Dauda, are speaking out about their struggles and demanding justice and support from the Nigerian government. In April 2014, over 200 schoolgirls were seized from their dormitory at the Government Secondary School Chibok in Borno state, northeastern Nigeria, in a devastating raid by extremists that drew international condemnation.

The Chibok abduction highlights the ongoing threat of terrorism and the need for governments to prioritize the safety and well-being of their citizens, particularly vulnerable groups such as women and children. The Chibok abduction highlights the ongoing threat of terrorism and the need for governments to prioritize the safety and well-being of their citizens, particularly vulnerable groups such as women and children. The survivors' stories also emphasize the importance of providing comprehensive support and resources for victims of trauma to rebuild their lives.

Dinah Lawan, now a second-year PhD student in political science at the University of California, recounted her harrowing experience during a program organized by Enough is Enough Nigeria (EiE) to mark the 10th anniversary of the abduction. "After the kidnapping, honestly, I almost gave up on education because what happened to me and my classmates that night was very difficult in so many ways," Lawan shared. Despite initially feeling discouraged, she decided to continue her education, realizing that giving up would only empower her captors.

Why this matters: Grace Dauda, who was among the 82 schoolgirls released in May 2017, shared her own struggles. Dauda sustained severe injuries to her thighs during the abduction and underwent four surgeries, including one abroad. She expressed frustration with the lack of government support, stating, "I feel like many people are just using us for their own interest because we suffered a lot and we didn't get what we wanted." Dauda called on the government to assist those who are no longer interested in education by providing them with business opportunities.

The two survivors' accounts highlight the long-lasting impact of the Chibok abduction and the challenges faced by the girls in rebuilding their lives. Lawan expressed concern over the government's failure to establish a trauma management program for the freed girls, emphasizing the need for comprehensive support beyond just education.

As Nigeria marks the poignant 10-year anniversary of the Chibok abduction, the event hosted by Enough is Enough Nigeria aimed to hold the government accountable for the welfare of the schoolgirls. The organization launched a booklet detailing the girls' journeys and challenges since their release, vowing to continue advocating for their well-being and demanding the government fulfill its responsibilities in supporting and protecting them.

The Chibok abduction remains a harsh reality of the ongoing threat posed by Boko Haram and the urgent need for the Nigerian government to address the security challenges in the region. Freed schoolgirls, still coping with the aftermath of their traumatic experience, make powerful demands for justice and support, showcasing their resilience and determination to rebuild their lives.

The Nigerian government has announcedthat it is in the process of transferring the girls to the Borno State Government for proper reintegration into society. However, the survivors' accounts highlight the need for a more comprehensive and long-term approach to support their healing and empowerment. "I want all my classmates to keep fighting and never give up,"Lawan urged. "One of the lessons I have learned from my experiences is that when unpleasant circumstances occur, things can never be the same but life has to go on."

Key Takeaways

  • Two Chibok schoolgirl kidnapping survivors, Dinah Lawan and Grace Dauda, speak out 10 years after their abduction.
  • Their stories highlight the ongoing threat of terrorism and the need for government support for victims.
  • Lawan and Dauda demand justice and comprehensive support from the Nigerian government.
  • The government's response has been inadequate, with survivors still struggling to rebuild their lives.
  • The survivors' accounts emphasize the importance of trauma management and long-term support for victims.