EU Survey Reveals Persistent Discrimination and Violence Against LGBTIQ Individuals

A recent EU survey found 36% of LGBTIQ individuals faced discrimination in 2023, down from 42% previously, but violence and negative attitudes persist. The survey revealed 14% of respondents experienced hate-motivated violence, and 59% reported an increase in violence over the past five years.

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Nitish Verma
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EU Survey Reveals Persistent Discrimination and Violence Against LGBTIQ Individuals

EU Survey Reveals Persistent Discrimination and Violence Against LGBTIQ Individuals

A recent survey conducted by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) has found that 36% of LGBTIQ individuals in the EU faced discrimination in 2023, down from 42% previously. Despite this decrease, the survey highlights persisting challenges, including increased violence and negative social attitudes.

Why this matters: This survey's findings have significant implications for the EU's efforts to promote equality and human rights, and underscore the need for continued action to combat discrimination andviolence against LGBTIQ individuals. The persistence of discrimination and violence also has broader implications for social cohesion and public health in the EU.

The survey, which involved over 100,000 respondents from 30 EU countries, revealed that 14% of respondents experienced hate-motivated violence, including physical and sexual attacks, up from 11% in 2019. Furthermore, 59% of respondents reported an increase in violence in the past five years, and 53% believe prejudice and intolerance have increased.

FRA director Sirpa Rautio commented on the findings, stating, "On the one hand, people are becoming more open about their sexual orientation. On the other hand, everyday harassment, bullying in schools, hate crime and alarmingly high rates of violence tell another story." The FRA report also noted that "Most (LGBTQ people) still avoid holding hands with their partner in public for fear of being attacked."

The survey found substantial variations in discrimination rates for trans women across EU countries, with the highest rates in Portugal (77%), Italy (75%), and France (70%). The lowest prevalence values of discrimination were found in Finland (41%) and Czechia (44%). In Ireland, trust in government efforts to combat prejudice and intolerance decreased from 67% in 2019 to 40% in 2023.

Despite some advancements, the report highlights a concerning reality of discrimination, violence, and harassment endured by LGBTIQ individuals across the EU. Over a third of respondents reported daily encounters with discrimination, yet most incidents go unreported. The survey further underscores the mental health toll on LGBTIQ individuals, with over a third admitting to contemplating suicide, and even more distressingly, over half of trans, non-binary, and gender-diverse individuals reporting suicidal thoughts.

The FRA survey serves as a stark reminder of the ongoing challenges faced by LGBTIQ individuals in the EU. While progress has been made in terms of openness and acceptance, the findings underscore the urgent need for increased efforts to combat discrimination, violence, and harassment against the LGBTIQ community across Europe.

Key Takeaways

  • 36% of LGBTIQ individuals in the EU faced discrimination in 2023, down from 42% previously.
  • 14% of respondents experienced hate-motivated violence, up from 11% in 2019.
  • 59% of respondents reported an increase in violence in the past five years.
  • Over a third of LGBTIQ individuals contemplate suicide, with 50% of trans individuals reporting suicidal thoughts.
  • Most LGBTIQ individuals still avoid holding hands with their partner in public for fear of being attacked.