Pro-Cash Advocates Plan National Boycott of Woolworths and Coles

Pro-cash advocates in Australia are organizing a national boycott against supermarket giants Woolworths and Coles on May 4, 2024, to protest cash-out policy changes and card-only registers. The boycott aims to raise awareness about the potential consequences of a cashless economy on small businesses and individuals.

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Pro-Cash Advocates Plan National Boycott of Woolworths and Coles

Pro-Cash Advocates Plan National Boycott of Woolworths and Coles

Pro-cash advocates in Australia are organizing a national boycott against supermarket giants Woolworths and Coles. The movement, led by the 'Call Out Cashless Businesses' Facebook group with over 55,000 members, is protesting recent changes in cash-out policies and the introduction of more card-only self-serve registers in stores.

Why this matters: The shift towards a cashless economy has significant implications for small businesses and individuals who rely on cash transactions, potentially leading to their exclusion from the economy. The shift towards a cashless economy has significant implications for small businesses and individuals who rely on cash transactions, potentially leading to their exclusion from the economy. As Australia moves closer to becoming a "technically cashless" society, we must weigh the consequences of this transition on vulnerable populations and local economies.

The boycott aims to raise awareness about the potential consequences of a cashless economy on small businesses and individuals who rely on cash transactions. Advocates argue that the push towards digital payments by large retailers could lead to the elimination of cash entirely, harming local family-owned businesses.

A widely circulated flyer reads: "Avoid both stores on the 4th of May, 2024. Give them NO transactions at all. Support family business instead. May the 4th be with you ..." The movement has gained traction on social media, with many users pledging their support and expressing concerns about the dominance of large retailers if smaller businesses are not supported.

While pro-cash supporters argue that cash is legal tender and should not be refused, the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission's website states that businesses can choose which payment types they accept, as long as it is made clear to consumers before making a purchase. Both Coles and Woolworths have stated that they accept cash at all their stores and have no plans to go completely cashless.

The boycott comes amidst growing concerns about the rapid shift towards a cashless society in Australia. In January 2024, Macquarie Bank announced that customers would no longer be able to use cash at its branches, sparking backlash from many Australians. Experts predict that Australia could become a "technically cashless" society in as little as two years, driven by the convenience of digital payments and advancements in banking technology.

The debate over the future of cash in Australia has intensified prior to the May 4th boycott. While the convenience of digital payments is undeniable, the potential impact on small businesses and individuals who rely on cash transactions cannot be ignored. The outcome of the boycott and its effect on the policies of major retailers like Woolworths and Coles remains to be seen, but it has undoubtedly sparked a vital conversation about the balance between technological advancement and the needs of all members of society in an increasingly digital world.

Key Takeaways

  • May 4, 2024: Pro-cash advocates in Australia boycott Woolworths and Coles over cashless policies.
  • Cashless economy could exclude small businesses and individuals who rely on cash transactions.
  • Boycott aims to raise awareness about the consequences of a cashless economy on local economies.
  • Australia may become "technically cashless" in 2 years, driven by digital payments and banking tech.
  • Debate intensifies over the balance between tech advancement and the needs of all members of society.