Terminally Ill Grandad Denied Life Insurance Payout Due to Clause

Shaun Pinkney, a 53-year-old grandfather from Salford, is denied a life insurance payout by Aviva due to an 18-month clause in his contract, despite paying premiums for 15 years, after being diagnosed with terminal multiple myeloma cancer. The case highlights the need for greater transparency and fairness in the insurance industry, particularly with regard to terminal illness clauses, and raises questions about the accountability of insurance companies to their customers in times of great need." This description focuses on the primary topic of the article (the denial of a life insurance payout), the main entities involved (Shaun Pinkney and Aviva), the context (the insurance industry and terminal illness clauses), and the significant actions and implications (the denial of the payout and the need for greater transparency and fairness). The description also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the image of a person in a wheelchair, a life insurance policy document, or a logo of Aviva.

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Nitish Verma
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Terminally Ill Grandad Denied Life Insurance Payout Due to Clause

Terminally Ill Grandad Denied Life Insurance Payout Due to Clause

Shaun Pinkney, a 53-year-old grandad from Salford, has been diagnosed with terminal multiple myeloma cancer. Despite paying life insurance premiums to Aviva for 15 years, he has been denied a payout due to an 18-month clause in his contract.

Why this matters: This case highlights the need for greater transparency and fairness in the insurance industry, particularly when it comes to terminal illness clauses that can have devastating consequences for policyholders. It also raises questions about the accountability of insurance companies to their customers, especially in times of great need.

The clause, stated on page 12 of an 18-page policy conditions booklet provided to Shaun, specifies that someone with a terminal illness can only make a claim if they have 18 months or more left on their way. Shaun, who was diagnosed in April 2023, has been told he can't renew his annual policy because of his diagnosis and has only two months left on his contract.

Expressing his frustration, Shaun said, "So, if I'd got terminal cancer six months earlier than when I was diagnosed, they would have paid out? It's absolutely ridiculous." He added, "I'm getting penalised for getting cancer too late. I could pass away next week. I want this sorted out before I die."

An Aviva spokeswoman responded, saying, "We were very sorry to hear about Mr Pinkney's diagnosis. We understand the seriousness of his condition and appreciate that this must be a very worrying time for him."

Shaun, a father of four and grandfather of six, is now largely confined to a wheelchair and has undergone treatment, including an operation, chemotherapy, and a stem cell transplant. Aviva stopped selling policies with a mismatch between the end of the major benefit and the expiration of the rest of the policy in 2013.

Shaun Pinkney's case highlights the devastating impact of terminal illness clauses in life insurance policies. Despite paying premiums for over a decade, he finds himself denied a payout when he needs it most due to the timing of his cancer diagnosis. As he battles for a resolution in his final days, his story raises questions about the fairness and compassion of such clauses in the insurance industry.

Key Takeaways

  • Shaun Pinkney, 53, diagnosed with terminal multiple myeloma cancer.
  • Aviva denies life insurance payout due to 18-month clause.
  • Clause requires 18 months or more left on policy to claim.
  • Shaun has only 2 months left on his contract, no payout.
  • Case raises questions about fairness and compassion in insurance industry.