Locust Grove Estate, Former Home of Samuel Morse, Opens for Tours

Locust Grove Estate, the former summer home of Samuel Morse, is open for public tours from May to October in Poughkeepsie, New York. The 14,000-square-foot Italianate villa features 45 rooms and offers a glimpse into Morse's life and legacy as the creator of Morse code.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Locust Grove Estate, Former Home of Samuel Morse, Opens for Tours

Locust Grove Estate, Former Home of Samuel Morse, Opens for Tours

Thehistoric, homes, visit, tourLocust Grove Estate, the former summer home of renowned inventor Samuel Morse, is now open for public tours from May to October in Poughkeepsie, New York. The 14,000-square-foot Italianate villa, built in 1852, sits on a bluff overlooking the Hudson River and features 45 rooms across six floors, offering a glimpse into the life and legacy of the creator of Morse code.

Morse, his wife Sarah, and their four children spent every summer at the estate until his death in 1872. The property was later rented and eventually purchased by William and Martha Young in 1901, who renovated the interior and installed modern amenities like electricity and central heat. Their daughter, Annette, established a nonprofit to preserve and maintain the estate, which opened to the public in 1979.

While the grounds of Locust Grove Estate are open year-round, tours of the home are only available from May to October on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays. week Tours cost $20 per person and showcase the preserved 19th-century architecture and art that make the estate a unique and valuable historical resource. "It's a really unusually preserved house, so people that are interested in art and history and architecture can always find something here," said Ken Snodgrass, Director and Curator of the Locust Grove Estate.

Samuel Morse, best known for his invention of the Morse code and telegraph, was also an accomplished painter. His former home at Locust Grove Estate not only offers insight into his personal life and interests but also serves as a testament to his enduring legacy. The estate's preservation and public access ensure that future generations can appreciate and learn from this significant piece of American history.