Rare Corpse Flower 'Horace' Set to Bloom at Como Park Conservatory

The Como Park Conservatory in St. Paul, Minnesota, is preparing for the rare blooming of a corpse flower nicknamed "Horace" from May 11 to 19, 2024. Visitors can witness the flower's distinctive characteristics and pungent aroma in person or via livestream.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Rare Corpse Flower 'Horace' Set to Bloom at Como Park Conservatory

Rare Corpse Flower 'Horace' Set to Bloom at Como Park Conservatory

The Como Park Conservatory in St. Paul, Minnesota, is preparing for a unique botanical event: the blooming of a rare corpse flower nicknamed "Horace." This highly anticipated event is expected to take place from May 11 to 19, 2024, drawing visitors eager to witness the flower's distinctive characteristics and pungent aroma.

The corpse flower, scientifically known as Amorphophallus titanum, is native to the rain forests of Sumatra. It can take several years for the plant to bloom, but when it does, the bloom itself is short-lived, lasting only 24-48 hours. During this time, the flower emits a strong, rotting flesh-like odor that attracts flesh flies and carrion beetles for pollination.

Matt Reinartz, marketing and public relations manager at Como, described the event as "Rare and rancid, this odorous event is not to be missed... unless you're faint of heart or nose." He added, "It's a rare sight with an even rarer aroma – think rotting flesh meets curiosity."

Visitors will have the opportunity to witness Horace's bloom in person at the Exhibit Gallery every day from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. for a limited time. For those who prefer to observe from a distance, a livestream of the flower blooming will be available, allowing viewers to experience this rare event without the accompanying odor.

The conservatory hopes that this rare botanical event will raise awareness about the importance of preserving endangered species and their habitats. "We wholeheartedly celebrate this remarkable botanical event and hope to raise awareness about the importance of preserving endangered species and their habitats," Reinartz said.

Horace, the flowering plant, has been at the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory in St. Paul since 2019. Its upcoming bloom is generating excitement among visitors andbotanical enthusiastsalike. After blooming, the plant will develop bright red to orange fruits that are dispersed by animals in its native habitat.

The corpse flower's bloom at the Como Park Conservatory is a testament to the dedication and expertise of the conservatory staff in cultivating and preserving thisrare species. As visitors flock to witness Horace's bloom, they will not only be treated to a unique sensory experience but also gain a deeper appreciation for the wonders of the natural world and the importance of conservation efforts.