Woman Accused of Illegally Feeding Birds and Cats in Choa Chu Kang

A 60-year-old woman in Choa Chu Kang, Singapore, has been accused of illegally feeding birds and cats in the area, causing a mess and disturbing neighbors, despite warnings from the Choa Chu Kang Town Council and signs prohibiting bird feeding. The woman's actions have led to a dirty and unhealthy environment, posing health risks to nearby residents, especially children, and highlighting the importance of adhering to regulations to maintain a clean living environment." This description focuses on the primary topic of the article (the woman's illegal bird feeding), the main entities involved (the woman, the Choa Chu Kang Town Council, and the residents), the context (Choa Chu Kang, Singapore), and the significant consequences (mess, disturbance, and health risks). It also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the dirty environment and the presence of birds and residents.

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Woman Accused of Illegally Feeding Birds and Cats in Choa Chu Kang

Woman Accused of Illegally Feeding Birds and Cats in Choa Chu Kang

A 60-year-old woman in Choa Chu Kang, Singapore, has been accused of illegally feeding birds and cats in the area, causing a mess and disturbing neighbors. Despite warnings from the Choa Chu Kang Town Council and signs prohibiting bird feeding, the woman has been seen on multiple occasions feeding birds with bags of bread.

Why this matters: This incident highlights the importance of adhering to regulations and maintaining a clean living environment, which has a direct impact on public health and community well-being. Failure to address such issues can lead to the spread of diseases and create an unhealthy environment for residents.

The area below Block 276 Choa Chu Kang Avenue 2, where she feeds the birds, has become very dirty, with bird droppings all over. "This woman always brings a bag of bread down to feed the birds," said a 60-year-old resident surnamed Cai. Another resident, a 39-year-old surnamed Shen, noted that "Some of the birds will rest on the roof of the sheltered walkway, waiting to be fed."

Residents have complained about the mess and the health risks it poses, especially for children in the neighborhood. "She makes this place look like a bird park, with bird droppings all over the area, causing an inconvenience to nearby residents," said another resident. "Children have low immunity, so if there are any infectious diseases, it could be very dangerous," a concerned resident added.

The woman, who has lived in the block for over 10 years, has been feeding birds all year round, including behind the multi-storey car park. Around 20 pigeons were seen gathering in the area where she feeds them. A bowl of water was also left out on the grass.

The Choa Chu Kang Town Council has taken action to address the situation, including putting up signboards and posters to deter feeding. They have also highlighted the matter to relevant agencies and will continue to work on enforcement to maintain a pleasant living environment for all residents.

According to the Wildlife Act, the feeding of birds and other wildlife is illegal in Singapore. First-time offenders can face fines of up to $5,000, while repeat offenders may be fined up to $10,000. The incident at Block 276 Choa Chu Kang Avenue 2 serves as a reminder of the importance of adhering to these regulations to maintain clean and healthy living spaces for all in the community.

Key Takeaways

  • A 60-year-old woman in Singapore feeds birds and cats despite warnings and signs prohibiting it.
  • The area becomes dirty with bird droppings, posing health risks to residents, especially children.
  • Residents complain about the mess and health risks, with 20 pigeons gathering in the area.
  • The Choa Chu Kang Town Council takes action, putting up signs and working with agencies to enforce regulations.
  • Feeding wildlife is illegal in Singapore, with fines up to $10,000 for repeat offenders.