Baltimore Mayoral Race: Scott Holds Narrow Lead Over Dixon

The article reports on the closely contested Democratic primary race for Baltimore mayor between incumbent Mayor Brandon Scott and former Mayor Sheila Dixon, with Scott holding a narrow lead as of Tuesday night, and the outcome having significant implications for the city's approach to crime, public safety, housing, and community resources." This description focuses on the primary topic (the mayoral race), the main entities (Scott and Dixon), the context (Baltimore), and the significant actions/consequences (the outcome's impact on city policies). It also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the setting (Baltimore) and the key issues at stake (crime, public safety, housing, and community resources).

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Baltimore Mayoral Race: Scott Holds Narrow Lead Over Dixon

Baltimore Mayoral Race: Scott Holds Narrow Lead Over Dixon

The highly anticipated Democratic primary race for Baltimore mayor remains too close to call, with incumbent Mayor Brandon Scott holding a razor-thin margin over former Mayor Sheila Dixon. As of Tuesday night, with almost half of city precincts reporting, Scott leads Dixon by just over 2,000 votes, garnering 18,394 votes to Dixon's 16,424.

Why this matters: The outcome of this mayoral race will have significant implications for the city's approach to addressing crime and public safety, which has been a major concern for Baltimore residents. The winner will also shape the city's policies on housing, development, and community resources, affecting the daily lives of thousands of citizens.

The 2024 mayoral contest, a rematch of the 2020 race that put Scott in office, has been heavily focused on the critical issue of crime in Baltimore. Scott has touted the city's reduction in homicides in 2023, with fewer than 300 people killed for the first time in nearly a decade. Dixon, however, has argued that Scott has neglected quality of life crimes, allowing them to go unaddressed and driving residents from the city.

Earlier in the night, the race was even tighter, with Scott leading by just 167 votes with 25 out of 295 precincts reporting. At one point, the margin narrowed to a mere 23 votes with 11 precincts reporting. Initially, Dixon held a narrow lead, but Scott has since pulled ahead as more results have come in.

Voter turnout has been a key factor, with only 33,727 people voting in-person in Baltimore City as of 7:00 p.m. However, a "massive" amount of mail-in ballots have yet to be counted , according to FOX45 News reporter Mikenzie Frost. The Baltimore City Board of Elections will release additional results Tuesday night, including ballots cast in person on Election Day and during early voting, as well as about 11,700 mail-in ballots from Democratic voters. At least 13,500 additional ballots remained to be counted as of Monday.

Both candidates have put forth plans to address crime and the city's housing crisis. Their crime plans call for a focused deterrence model of policing, which would attempt to identify violent offenders and offer social supports to redirect them. On housing, both Scott and Dixon have proposed using Tax Increment Financing in various neighborhoods to address vacant properties.

The race has seen notable endorsements and fundraising efforts. Democratic State's Attorney Ivan Bates has endorsed Dixon, citing a lack of partnership between the prosecutor's office and Scott's City Hall. U.S. Senators Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen, along with numerous labor unions, have backed Scott. A PAC supporting Dixon, funded in part by Baltimore Sun co-owner and Sinclair Broadcasting Group chairman David Smith, has supplemented her campaign with voter outreach and online advertising. Scott has led in fundraising, spending nearly $1 million since January, while Dixon has spent $653,100.

As the remaining votes are tallied in the coming days, the outcome of this closely contested race will become clearer. The winner of the Democratic primary is expected to be the prohibitive favorite in the November general election in the heavily Democratic city. For now, both campaigns eagerly await the final results that will determine the future leadership of Baltimore.

Key Takeaways

  • Baltimore mayoral primary race is too close to call, with Mayor Brandon Scott leading former Mayor Sheila Dixon by 2,000 votes.
  • The winner will shape the city's approach to crime, public safety, housing, and community resources.
  • Crime is a major concern, with Scott touting a reduction in homicides and Dixon arguing he's neglected quality of life crimes.
  • Voter turnout is low, with only 33,727 in-person votes, but many mail-in ballots remain to be counted.
  • The winner of the Democratic primary is expected to be the favorite in the November general election.