Biden Accused of Dictatorial Actions on Student Loans, Israel Arms Sales

President Joe Biden faces criticism for potentially disregarding the Supreme Court's ruling on student loan debt forgiveness and withholding Congress-approved arms from Israel. The administration's actions have sparked controversy, with some accusing Biden of overstepping his authority and others supporting his decisions.

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Biden Accused of Dictatorial Actions on Student Loans, Israel Arms Sales

Biden Accused of Dictatorial Actions on Student Loans, Israel Arms Sales

President Joe Biden is facing accusations of acting like a dictator on two separate fronts - ignoring the Supreme Court's ruling on student loan debt forgiveness and refusing to send Congress-approved arms to Israel. Critics argue these moves undermine the rule of law and betray a key U.S. ally.

Why this matters: The controversy surrounding Biden's actions has significant implications for the balance of power between the executive and legislative branches, as well as the United States' relationships with its allies. If left unchecked, these actions could set a precedent for future administrations to disregard the rule of law and Congress's authority.

On the student loan issue, the Supreme Court struck down Biden's plan to cancel billions in federal student loan debt. However, the administration has indicated it may try to move forward with the plan anyway or pursue alternative routes to debt forgiveness, drawing the ire of Republicans who say Biden is flouting the court's authority.

Meanwhile, Biden has put a hold on sending certain arms to Israel that were approved by Congress, including a shipment of 3,500 bombs. The administration paused the transfer citing concerns over the weapons' potential use in densely populated areas of Gaza. But pro-Israel lawmakers accuse Biden of undercutting Israel's ability to defend itself against Hamas terrorism.

"The House and Senate acted on the will of the people, overwhelmingly providing Israel with the firepower to send a message: the U.S. and our allies will not cower to terrorist organizations like Hamas," said Reps. Ken Calvert, Tom Cole, Mario Díaz-Balart, and David Joyce. "We demand the administration fulfill our commitment to our great ally in the Middle East, especially so in this serious time of need."

The House is set to vote Wednesday on a bill that would compel the administration to approve the arms sale to Israel. It would also cut off pay for State and Defense officials involved in withholding the weapons. So far this year, Congress has approved $12.5 billion in military aid to Israel.

Human rights groups have criticized the use of heavy U.S. bombs in Gaza, saying they inflict a devastating toll on civilians. "2,000-pound bombs have a dramatic effect when dropped in dense areas, and by using them, Israel is knowingly taking action that leads to innocent people dying," said Stephen Miles, president of Win Without War.

The controversy over Biden's actions on student loans and Israel arms sales has sparked a heated debate. Critics accuse the president of overstepping his authority and damaging key relationships. Supporters argue he is standing up for struggling borrowers and preventing civilian casualties. The clashes underscore the challenges and divisions Biden faces as he navigates a range of complex domestic and foreign policy issues in a polarized political climate.

Key Takeaways

  • President Biden faces accusations of acting like a dictator over student loan debt forgiveness and Israel arms sales.
  • Supreme Court struck down Biden's student loan debt forgiveness plan, but administration may try to move forward.
  • Biden paused arms sale to Israel, citing concerns over civilian casualties, sparking criticism from pro-Israel lawmakers.
  • House to vote on bill compelling administration to approve arms sale to Israel and cut off pay for involved officials.
  • Critics accuse Biden of overstepping authority, while supporters argue he's standing up for borrowers and preventing civilian casualties.