Conservative Critics of Trump Face Backlash for Not Supporting Biden

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene introduced articles of impeachment against President Biden in 2021, accusing him of abuse of power. Senator Pete Ricketts recently criticized the Biden administration's energy policies, including the EV mandate and Clean Power Plan, as harmful to American workers and communities.

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Conservative Critics of Trump Face Backlash for Not Supporting Biden

Conservative Critics of Trump Face Backlash for Not Supporting Biden

Conservative critics of former US President Donald Trump are facing backlash for not supporting President Joe Biden, despite Biden's perceived anti-conservative stance and policies. This criticism comes as some Republicans have introduced articles of impeachment against President Biden.

Why this matters: The intense political polarization in the US has significant implications for the country's governance and policy-making, as it can lead to gridlock and hinder progress on critical issues. The ongoing debate over energy policy and the government's role in regulating the industry will have far-reaching consequences for the environment, economy, and American workers.

On January 21, 2021, just 24 hours after Biden took office, Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) introduced House Resolution 57, calling for President Biden's impeachment. Greene, who had only been in office for a few weeks, accused Biden of "abuse of power by enabling bribery and other high crimes and misdemeanors" due to his son Hunter Biden's work with individuals from foreign countries.

The impeachment effort highlights the intense political polarization in the US and is seen as a response to Biden's perceived anti-conservative policies and stance. More recently, on May 10, 2024, U.S. Senator Pete Ricketts (R-NE) delivered a speech on the Senate floor criticizing the Biden administration's anti-energy agenda.

Ricketts specifically targeted the electric vehicle (EV) mandate and the Clean Power Plan as examples of the administration appeasing radical environmentalist activists. The senator argued that these policies prioritize the interests of "coastal elites and radical environmentalists" over those of American workers and communities.

"They would rather see fossil fuel plants closed and thousands of workers lose their jobs than stand up to these activists. This appeasement of the far-left, radical environmentalist wing of the Democrat Party is wrong. It must stop," Ricketts stated. "We must reverse course. We must have some common sense. I'm here today to join my colleagues in standing up for American energy, for American workers, for our way of life."

The EV mandate requires up to two-thirds of all cars and light trucks sold in 2032 to be electric vehicles. Ricketts argued this mandate is "delusional" as it will block low-income families from owning cars, drive up used vehicle costs, and increase US dependence on China for critical EV battery minerals. The Clean Power Plan 2.0 aims to reduce carbon emissions from coal or gas electric plants by up to 90% by 2039, which Ricketts claimed is illegal and will stifle industry nationwide.

In Nebraska, 49% of electricity comes from coal-fired plants, and the state ranks third nationwide for industrial electricity customers. Fossil fuel plants generate about 60% of US electricity, with coal contributing 16.2%. Under the Clean Power Plan 2.0, over 78% of coal power plants would have to retire between 2028 and 2040.

Senator Ricketts' speech is part of a broader effort by conservative critics to push back against President Biden's anti-conservative stance and policies. His remarks underscore the ongoing debate over energy policy and the government's role in regulating the industry. As the 2024 presidential election approaches, these issues are likely to remain at the forefront of political discourse.