No Charges Filed in Perplexing Case ofFour Infants Foundin Boston Apartment

No criminal charges will be filed in the case of four deceased infants found in a Boston apartment freezer last November. The investigation was unable to determine the cause of death or whether the babies were born alive, leading to the decision not to prosecute.

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Quadri Adejumo
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No Charges Filed in Perplexing Case ofFour Infants Foundin Boston Apartment

No Charges Filed in Perplexing Case ofFour Infants Foundin Boston Apartment

The Suffolk County District Attorney's office announced on Tuesday that no criminal charges will be filed in the shocking and perplexing case involving the discovery of four deceased infants in a freezer in a South Boston apartment last November. The bodies of the babies, two boys and two girls, were found wrapped in tinfoil and stored in shoe boxes on November 17, 2022, sparking a complex and unusual investigation.

Why this matters: This case raises questions about the accountability of individuals who conceal pregnancies and the births of children, and highlights the challenges of investigating and prosecuting such cases. This case raises questions about the accountability of individuals who conceal pregnancies and the births of children, and highlights the challenges of investigating and prosecuting such cases. It also emphasizes the need for greater support systems formothers who may be struggling with mental health issues or other challenges that could lead to such tragic outcomes.

District Attorney Kevin Hayden described the case as "one of the most complex, unusual and perplexing" that his office has ever encountered. The investigation, led by the Boston Police Department Homicide Unit, the Crime Laboratory, and the Massachusetts Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, sought to uncover the circumstances surrounding the infants' deaths and determine if any criminal charges were warranted.

Investigators revealed that themotherof the four infants is 69-year-old Alexis Aldamir, who purchased the apartment where the bodies were found in October 1983. Aldamir, now residing in a residential healthcare facility, appeared confused and lacked understanding during questioning by investigators. DNA testing confirmed that Aldamir was the mother of all four babies and identified the likely father, who passed away in 2011.

Autopsies conducted by the medical examiner's office were unable to determine the cause of death, listing it as "undetermined." The examinations found no signs of internal or external trauma or obvious injuries to the babies, estimated to be between 37 and 40 weeks old at the time of their deaths. The umbilical cords were still attached to the infants, deepening the mystery surrounding their births and deaths.

The lack of evidence and inability to establish whether the babies were born alive posed significant challenges for investigators in determining if any crimes could be proven. "We will never know exactly where or when the four babies found in Alexis Aldamir's apartment were born," District Attorney Hayden stated. "We will never know if the four babies were born alive, and we will never know exactly what happened to them."

The investigation uncovered that Aldamir had given birth to another baby girl in April 1982, and a fifth child with the same father was given up for adoption. However, no birth records were found for the four infants discovered in the freezer, raising questions about how Aldamir concealed her pregnancies and the circumstances surrounding their births.

Given the absence of evidence proving the babies were born alive and the lack of signs of trauma or injury, the District Attorney's office determined it could not ethically proceed with criminal charges against Aldamir. Her cognitive issues and inability to provide relevant information during questioning also factored into the decision not to prosecute.

"A prosecutor's office cannot ethically move forward with a case that, in good faith, it believes it cannot bring to trial,"District Attorney Hayden explained. The case has left the community with more questions than answers, with the circumstances surrounding the births, deaths, and concealment of the four infants remaining largely unknown.

Key Takeaways

  • No criminal charges filed in case of 4 deceased infants found in Boston apartment freezer.
  • Bodies of 2 boys, 2 girls, found wrapped in tinfoil, estimated to be 37-40 weeks old.
  • 69-year-old Alexis Aldamir, mother of the infants, lacked understanding during questioning.
  • Autopsies couldn't determine cause of death, no signs of trauma or injury found.
  • DA's office couldn't prove crimes due to lack of evidence, cognitive issues of suspect.