Daughter of Dublin Bombing Victim Calls for Full Investigation into 1974 Atrocities

Sharon Askin, daughter of a 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombing victim, calls for a full investigation into the atrocities on the 50th anniversary. Operation Denton, led by Iain Livingstone, has accessed top-secret material and is expected to release a report early next year.

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Daughter of Dublin Bombing Victim Calls for Full Investigation into 1974 Atrocities

Daughter of Dublin Bombing Victim Calls for Full Investigation into 1974 Atrocities

Sharon Askin, daughter of Paddy Askin, one of 37 victims of the 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings, is calling for a full investigation into the atrocities on the 50th anniversary of the attacks. She claims a 50-year 'cover-up' has shielded the perpetrators from justice.

Why this matters: The investigation into the Dublin and Monaghan bombings has far-reaching implications for the pursuit of truth and accountability in cases of political violence and terrorism. Uncovering the truth behind these atrocities could also lead to a greater understanding of the complexities of the Troubles and inform strategies for preventing similar violence in the future.

On May 17, 1974, three no-warning car bombs exploded in Dublin during evening rush hour, killing 34 people. A fourth bomb exploded in Co Monaghan an hour and a half later, making it the deadliest attack of the Troubles. The Glennane Gang, a group of loyalist paramilitaries, rogue soldiers, and police officers, is suspected of carrying out the bombings.

Iain Livingstone, a former senior police officer, is leading Operation Denton, an investigation into the Glennane Gang. The investigation has accessed never-before-seen top-secret material, including intelligence reports from MI5 and Legacy Special Branch, and information from top-secret cabinet meetings of the British government.

"Operation Denton has had access to secret and top secret material that no other previous investigation ever has," said Livingstone. "We've seen all information that's there to allow us make a full report on the circumstances around the Glennane series."

The investigation has pieced together information from various sources, including people who have come forward with additional details. The Operation Denton report is expected early next year.

Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs Micheál Martin believes the report should lead to a renewed push from both the Irish and British governments to investigate what happened. "It would be very important particularly after the publication of Operation Denton that we make one final effort collectively, the two governments, to get to the bottom of it," he said.

An Garda Síochána has fully cooperated with Operation Denton, handing over all documents it has on the bombings, including intelligence files. The Dáil has also unanimously passed a motion on three separate occasions calling on the British government to release all intelligence documents it holds connected to the bombings.

The Glennane Gang is blamed for approximately 120 sectarian murders in the 1970s and 1980s. With the 50th anniversary of the Dublin and Monaghan bombings, there are renewed calls for a full investigation to finally uncover the truth and bring those responsible to justice. The upcoming Operation Denton report in early 2025 could be a critical step in that direction.

Key Takeaways

  • Sharon Askin demands full investigation into 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings on 50th anniversary.
  • Glennane Gang suspected of carrying out bombings, killing 37 people.
  • Operation Denton investigation accesses top-secret material, including MI5 reports.
  • Report expected in 2025, could lead to renewed push for justice and truth.
  • Irish and British governments urged to cooperate and release all intelligence documents.