Jon Stewart Skewers Media's 'Penis-to-Penis Coverage' of Trump Hush Money Trial

Comedian Jon Stewart mocks media's excessive coverage of Donald Trump's hush money trial, particularly salacious details. Trump's criminal trial resumes in Manhattan, where he faces 34 felony counts of falsifying business records.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Jon Stewart Skewers Media's 'Penis-to-Penis Coverage' of Trump Hush Money Trial

Jon Stewart Skewers Media's 'Penis-to-Penis Coverage' of Trump Hush Money Trial

Comedian Jon Stewart returned to "The Daily Show" on Thursday and wasted no time mocking the media's obsessive coverage of Donald Trump's hush money trial, particularly the salacious testimony of porn star Stormy Daniels. In his opening monologue, Stewart ridiculed the wall-to-wall reporting, saying, "It has been another big week of wall-to-wall, nonstop penis-to-penis coverage of Donald Trump's trial."

Why this matters: The media's excessive focus on sensational details in the Trump hush money trial may distract from the significant legal and political implications of the case. As the trial unfolds, the public's perception of the proceedings will shape the political landscape and influence the outcome of future elections.

Stewart specifically targeted CNN's report on Trump's attire during his alleged encounter with Daniels in 2006. When CNN mentioned that Trump was wearing "satin or silk pajamas," Stewart jokingly exclaimed, "WHICH?! I need to know!" He also poked fun at another report discussing the missionary position, quipping, "No wonder Trump has locked up the Evangelical voting bloc....Tell us more."

The comedian further criticized MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell for mentioning that Trump did not wear a condom during his tryst with Daniels, saying he had reached his limit with the excessive details being reported. Stewart's monologue highlighted the media's fixation on trivial aspects of the trial while the proceedings continue to unfold with significant implications for Trump's legal and political future.

Trump's criminal hush money trial resumed on Friday in Manhattan, where he faces 34 felony counts of falsifying business records to conceal a $130,000 payment to Daniels on the eve of the 2016 election. The prosecution will continue presenting its case against the former president, who has vehemently denied any wrongdoing.

As the trial is not being televised, news photographers are only permitted in the courtroom for 45 seconds at the start of each day. Sketch artists are creating portraits of the proceedings, providing the only other visual record from inside the courtroom. Despite the limited access, media outlets continue to closely follow every development in the high-profile case.