Modi's Claim on Manmohan Singh's Alleged Statement on Muslims Questioned Amid 2024 Election Campaign

PM Modi's claim about Manmohan Singh's statement on Muslims' right to wealth is inaccurate, highlighting religious polarization in Indian politics. The controversy underscores the need for responsible campaigning and adherence to the Model Code of Conduct.

author-image
Dil Bar Irshad
Updated On
New Update
Modi's Claim on Manmohan Singh's Alleged Statement on Muslims Questioned Amid 2024 Election Campaign

Modi's Claim on Manmohan Singh's Alleged Statement on Muslims Questioned Amid 2024 Election Campaign

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's recent claim that former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had stated Muslims have the "first right" to the nation's wealth has come under scrutiny as the 2024 Lok Sabha election campaign heats up in India.

During a campaign speech, Modi accused the opposition Congress party of planning to "redistribute wealth" and give it to "infiltrators" and "those who have more children."

However, fact-checking reveals that Modi's claim is inaccurate. The Congress party's 2024 manifesto does not mention surveying or redistributing gold or wealth, nor does it state that this wealth will be given to "infiltrators" or those with more children. While Muslim women have a marginally higher total fertility rate compared to Hindu women, the difference is not as significant as suggested by Modi's claim.

Former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had actually stated in 2006 that plans and schemes for marginalized groups would have the "first claim on resources," which is different from the claim made by Modi. The Congress party has lodged a complaint with the Election Commission, alleging that Modi invoked religion and religious symbols to create enmity between groups.

Why this matters: The controversy highlights the increasing religious polarization in Indian politics, particularly during election campaigns. Prime Minister Modi's remarks have been seen as an attempt to pit communities against each other and divert attention from pressing socio-economic issues.

The BJP has also reiterated the claim that the Congress had attempted to give reservation meant for Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes, and Other Backward Classes to Muslims, with Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath accusing the Congress of attempting to impose "Taliban law" on India. The Election Commission has issued notices to both Modi and Congress leaders over alleged violations of the Model Code of Conduct in their campaign speeches.

As the second phase of the Lok Sabha elections concluded on April 26, covering 88 seats across 13 states, the political row over Modi's comments continues. The Congress party has distanced itself from remarks made by Indian Overseas Congress chairman Sam Pitroda about inheritance tax in the US, with party leader Jairam Ramesh stating that Pitroda's views do not always reflect the position of the Indian National Congress.

The Election Commission emphasized that star campaigners are expected to contribute to a higher quality of discourse and set high standards of compliance with the Model Code of Conduct.

Key Takeaways

  • PM Modi's claim about Manmohan Singh's statement on Muslims' rights is inaccurate.
  • Congress' 2024 manifesto does not mention wealth redistribution or favoring "infiltrators".
  • Manmohan Singh had stated marginalized groups would have "first claim on resources".
  • Controversy highlights religious polarization in Indian politics during election campaigns.
  • EC issued notices to both Modi and Congress leaders over alleged MCC violations.