White House and New York Times Feud Escalates Over Biden Coverage

The White House and The New York Times are engaged in an escalating feud over the newspaper's coverage of President Biden, with tensions reflecting broader media-government tensions and implications for the 2024 election.

author-image
Trim Correspondents
Updated On
New Update
White House and New York Times Feud Escalates Over Biden Coverage

White House and New York Times Feud Escalates Over Biden Coverage

The White House and The New York Times are engaged in an escalating feud over the newspaper's coverage of President Joe Biden. The Biden administration has accused the Times of being "entitled" and failing to provide fair and impartial reporting, particularly regarding the 2024 election. The Times, in turn, has defended its journalism practices and criticized the White House for being overly sensitive and attempting to control coverage of the president.

The tensions between the Democratic president and the Times have been simmering for years, with the White House viewing the newspaper as arrogant and unwilling to give Biden his due, while the Times feels aggrieved over the president's refusal to grant it a sit-down interview. The feud reflects a broader resentment from the president's working-class team toward the Times' perceived elite audience and a desire for its affirmation of their work.

Specific incidents have contributed to the strained relationship, including the White House removing Times reporters from its email list and the Biden campaign's criticism of the Times' coverage. The administration has also been accused of politicizing the Department of Justice and targeting the president's political opponents, including former President Donald Trump.

Why this matters: The escalating feud between the White House and The New York Times highlights the ongoing tensions between the media and the government, as well as the challenges of maintaining a free and independent press in an increasingly polarized political climate. The outcome of this dispute could have significant implications for the coverage of the 2024 presidential election and the public's trust in both institutions.

The feud reached a boiling point when Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger confronted Vice President Kamala Harris about Biden's decision to avoid interviews with major newspapers. Sulzberger believes that only an interview with the Times can verify that the 81-year-old President Biden is still fit to hold the presidency. The White House, however, sees Sulzberger's argument as one of "entitlement," and some officials believe the Times is running more stories criticizing Biden's age and other issues because the president won't sit down for an exclusive interview with the newspaper.

"The White House sees the Times as arrogant and unwilling to give Biden positive coverage, while the Times believes it has a right to a long-form interview with the president that the White House has refused," according to a source familiar with the situation. The feud reflects a broader tension between the White House and the press, with both sides accusing the other of overstepping their boundaries.

Key Takeaways

  • White House and NYT engaged in escalating feud over Biden coverage
  • Biden admin accuses NYT of being "entitled" and biased; NYT defends journalism
  • Tensions stem from White House's view of NYT as elitist, NYT's desire for Biden interview
  • Feud highlights tensions between media and government, challenges of independent press
  • Outcome could impact 2024 election coverage and public trust in both institutions