Bradford Police Launch 'JogOn' Campaign to Tackle Harassment of Female Runners

Bradford police launch 'JogOn' campaign to address harassment of female runners, encouraging reporting and community outreach to tackle cultural stigmas and create safer public spaces.

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Bradford Police Launch 'JogOn' Campaign to Tackle Harassment of Female Runners

Bradford Police Launch 'JogOn' Campaign to Tackle Harassment of Female Runners

Police in Bradford, UK have launched a new initiative called the 'JogOn' campaign to address the widespread problem of harassment faced by female runners in the city.

The campaign comes in response to a report by the College of Policing and Manchester University which found that over two-thirds of women surveyed had experienced some form of abuse while running, but did not report the incidents to the police.

The 'JogOn' campaign aims to encourage women to come forward and report any harassment they encounter while out running. Police are also warning potential offenders that they could face fines of up to £1,000 if caught engaging in such behavior. Officers have been attending local running events to raise awareness about the issue and to get men to be allies in the effort to end harassment of female runners.

Safya Khan, a runner in Bradford, has welcomed the campaign but says more education is needed in some communities to address the cultural stigma around Asian women being seen out running. "The kind of harassment I've faced includes unwanted comments and jeers, particularly when I'm running in my hijab," Khan said. "There needs to be more outreach to certain communities to address these attitudes."

Why this matters: The 'JogOn' campaign highlights the pervasive issue of harassment faced by women in public spaces, which can discourage them from engaging in healthy activities like running. Initiatives like this are important steps in creating safer environments for women and sending a strong message that such behavior will not be tolerated.

The Bradford police have made it clear that they are taking the harassment of female runners seriously with the launch of the 'JogOn' campaign. By encouraging reporting, warning offenders of potential fines, and engaging the community in the effort, they hope to create a shift in culture where women can feel safe and empowered to run without fear of abuse. The campaign also underscores the need for more education and outreach in communities where cultural stigmas may be contributing to the problem.

Key Takeaways

  • UK police launch 'JogOn' campaign to address harassment of female runners.
  • Over two-thirds of women surveyed faced abuse while running, but did not report it.
  • Police warn offenders could face £1,000 fines and engage community to end harassment.
  • The campaign aims to encourage women to report harassment and create safer environments.
  • More education needed to address cultural stigmas around Asian women running in public.