Montreal Cyclist Criticizes Reckless Cycling, Urges Obeying Traffic Laws

Cyclists in Montreal's Plateau Mont-Royal borough are ignoring laws requiring them to stop at school buses with flashing lights, putting children's safety at risk. A cyclist hit a child attempting to board a school bus, highlighting the need for education and enforcement to ensure safe transportation.

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Bijay Laxmi
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Montreal Cyclist Criticizes Reckless Cycling, Urges Obeying Traffic Laws

Montreal Cyclist Criticizes Reckless Cycling, Urges Obeying Traffic Laws

Residents on Jeanne-Mance Street in Montreal's Plateau Mont-Royal borough are expressing concern over reckless cycling behavior, particularly around stopped school buses with flashing lights. Despite the law requiring cyclists to stop at least 5 meters from a school bus with its flashing red lights or stop sign in operation, multiple cyclists have been seen ignoring the rules, putting children's safety at risk.

Why this matters: The reckless behavior of cyclists around school buses highlights a broader issue of road safety and the need for all users to follow traffic laws. If left unchecked, such behavior can lead to serious accidents and injuries, emphasizing the importance of education and enforcement to ensure safe transportation for all.

On Thursday, a person on a bicycle hit a child who was about to board a school bus. The following afternoon, Global News witnessed three cyclists ignore the stop sign and flashing lights on two school buses letting children off. Mayer Feig, a resident on Jeanne-Mance Street, reported that his son was involved in a similar incident a year ago, and another neighbor experienced a comparable situation a few months ago.

Magali Bebronne of cycling advocacy group Vélo Québec expressed her concern over the accident and emphasized the need for better communication of the law to cyclists. "We think that there should be an information blitz to make sure that all cyclists know about this rule," Bebronne stated. Mayer Feig criticized the bike lanes on both sides of Jeanne-Mance Street, stating that they make it difficult for children to move around safely.

Montreal police confirmed that the cyclist involved in Thursday's accident broke the law and will face a fine of $131, including costs. The law requiring cyclists to stop for school buses with flashing lights has been in effect since 2018. The Société de l'assurance automobile du Québec states that cyclists and motorists must stop at least 5 meters from a school bus or minibus with its flashing red lights or stop sign in operation.

In recognition of National Bicycle Safety Month, the city of Santa Maria, California has been awarded a $120,000 grant to support a bicycle and pedestrian safety program. The grant will fund educational programs teaching bicycle safety rules, helmet distributions, and education. Additionally, pop-up events will be held to promote visibility for bicyclists. The program aims to promote bicycle safety and raise awareness about the importance of following traffic laws and safety measures.

The incidents in Montreal highlight the critical need for cyclists to obey traffic laws and prioritize safety, especially around school buses. With increased education and awareness, communities can work together to create safer environments for all road users, particularly vulnerable children. The $120,000 grant awarded to Santa Maria, California serves as an example of proactive measures to promote bicycle safety through education and visibility initiatives.