Australia's SailGP Team Faces Uncertainty After Costly Crash

Australia's SailGP team was docked 12 event points and 8 overall season points after a crash in Christchurch, New Zealand, due to a split-second decision to avoid a collision. The team, feeling the penalty was unjust, filed a protest, but it was rejected, knocking them out of the top spot in the season standings.

author-image
Salman Khan
Updated On
New Update
Australia's SailGP Team Faces Uncertainty After Costly Crash

Australia's SailGP Team Faces Uncertainty After Costly Crash

Australia's SailGP team finds itself in a precarious position heading into the Grand Final after being docked a significant 12 event points and 8 overall season points following a crash during the Christchurch event in New Zealand. The incident occurred in the first fleet race when driver Tom Slingsby made the split-second decision to veer into a finish line buoy marker to avoid a potentially dangerous collision with the Canadian team's F50 foiling catamaran.

Slingsby explained his actions, stating, "I kind of had the choice to run straight through Canada or hit the mark... I think if I carried on straight I would have really injured someone. So I'm glad I did what I did." Despite Slingsby's intentions to prevent a more serious accident, SailGP umpires determined the Australians were at fault and imposed the hefty penalty.

The Australian team, feeling the penalty was unjust, described it as "totally unfair" and filed an official protest. However, their protest was rejected by the umpires. Slingsby argued against the severity of the penalty, saying, "This is double the highest penalty points ever given and it's defined as reckless sailing – so in their minds this is the most reckless sailing we've ever seen in SailGP, which is definitely not the case."

Craig Mitchell, SailGP's chief umpire, stood by the decision to penalize the Australians, citing their violation of Rule 57, which deals with causing damage to F50s through reckless sailing. The 12-point penalty was given for "breaking Rule 57" and "causing serious damage" to their own vessel. The penalty points increase based on the extent of the damage incurred.

The costly penalty has knocked Australia out of the top spot in the season standings, with New Zealand's Black Foils now holding a comfortable nine-point lead. Peter Burling, the driver for the New Zealand team, acknowledged the harshness of SailGP's penalty system but emphasized its clarity in discouraging reckless sailing and protecting the high-performance boats. Burling commented, "I've always said that the collision penalty points are ridiculously harsh in SailGP."

This weekend in Bermuda, Australia's Tech Team has managed to repair the damaged beam on their F50, allowing them to compete. However, the team faces an uphill battle to secure a spot in the Grand Final. The incident in Christchurch was not an isolated one, with Great Britain and Denmark also being docked four points each for crashes during the event.

With four events remaining, New Zealand sits atop the leaderboard with 68 points, followed by Australia with 59 points. Spain, France, and Denmark round out the top five with 55, 54, and 50 points, respectively. The tight point margins ensure an exciting conclusion to the SailGP season, as teams fight for a place in the winner-takes-all final.

The incident in Christchurch highlights the high-stakes nature of SailGP racing and the significant impact that split-second decisions can have on a team's championship aspirations. Season progression will put all eyes on the Australian team to see if they can overcome this setback and claw their way back into contention for the Grand Final.

Key Takeaways

  • Australia's SailGP team docked 12 event points and 8 season points for crash in Christchurch.
  • Driver Tom Slingsby made split-second decision to avoid collision with Canada's F50.
  • SailGP umpires deemed Australia at fault, imposing "totally unfair" penalty.
  • New Zealand's Black Foils now lead season standings with 9-point advantage.
  • Australia faces uphill battle to secure Grand Final spot with 4 events remaining.