Corey 'Homicide' Williams, Streetball Legend and Former NBL Star, Dies at 46

Corey "Homicide" Williams, a renowned streetball player and former pro basketball star, died at 46 after a year-long battle with stage four colon cancer. Williams left a legacy in the basketball world, playing in the NBA Summer League and Australia's NBL, and later becoming a beloved commentator.

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Bijay Laxmi
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Corey 'Homicide' Williams, Streetball Legend and Former NBL Star, Dies at 46

Corey 'Homicide' Williams, Streetball Legend and Former NBL Star, Dies at 46

Corey "Homicide" Williams, a renowned streetball player and former professional basketball star, passed away on May 10, 2024, at the age of 46 after a year-long battle with stage four colon cancer. Williams, who was born and raised in The Bronx, New York, left behind a legacy in the basketball world and two daughters.

Williams began his career as a streetball player in New York City, where he gained notoriety for his flashy style and high-scoring ability. "I went into it with a certain goal in mind. I didn't necessarily want to win games, I wanted to turn heads. And I was going to do that through volume," Williams wrote in a 2016 article for The Players' Tribune. His streetball fame eventually led to professional opportunities, including playing in the 2007 NBA Summer League for the Golden State Warriors.

Williams made a name for himself in Australia's National Basketball League (NBL), where he played for the Townsville Crocodiles and Melbourne Tigers in the late 2000s. In his third season with the Crocodiles, he won the NBL's MVP award, averaging 18.6 points, 5 rebounds, and 4.1 assists per game. Williams played a total of 114 games in the NBL over four seasons before retiring after stints in Lebanon and Puerto Rico.

After his playing career, Williams transitioned into commentary in 2015, becoming known for his brutally honest and witty style. He famously coined the term "this ain't no cupcake league" when describing the competitiveness of the NBL. Williams' influence helped revive interest in the flagging league, which is now enjoying historic levels of success and viewership.

Australian basketball star Chris Anstey credited Williams with playing a huge role in elevating the NBL from the brink of oblivion to unprecedented heights. "Maybe, just maybe, on the day this deal is announced, and the day our basketball community mourns the loss of one of our great people and personalities, Homicide is smiling somewhere knowing how pivotal he was in making it happen. RIP mate,"Anstey posted on social media.

NBL owner Larry Kestelman also praised Williams, saying that recruiting him was the catalyst for the league's incredible growth. "Having Corey as part of the NBL commentary team was by far one of the best decisions I ever made, and without his passion for the League and enthusiasm for the growth of the game in Australia, we simply wouldn't be where we are today," Kestelman said. "There will never be another Corey 'Homicide' Williams, may he rest in peace."

Williams was diagnosed with stage four colon cancer in August 2022 while in his hometown of New York. He underwent treatment in the US before returning to Australia, where he expressed gratitude for the support of the basketball community. In March 2024, Williams said that returning to Australia early in his cancer battle was "the best decision" he made, believing that the country's healthcare system and peaceful environment would help him heal.

The basketball world has extended condolences to Williams' family, with tributes pouring in from the NBL, the Sports Entertainment Network, and the New York City streetball community. Corey "Homicide" Williams leaves behind a unique legacy as a player, commentator, and influential figure who helped shape the resurgence of Australian basketball. His infectious positivity, laugh, and smile will be deeply missed by all those whose lives he touched.