Hip Preservation Surgery Shows Promising Return-to-Sport Rates for Young Athletes

Dr. Jacob L. Henrichsen presented a study at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting, showing 72% of young athletes returned to sports after hip preservation surgery. The study's findings are crucial for counseling athletes with femoroacetabular impingement and hip dysplasia.

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Hip Preservation Surgery Shows Promising Return-to-Sport Rates for Young Athletes

Hip Preservation Surgery Shows Promising Return-to-Sport Rates for Young Athletes

At the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting in Boston, Dr. Jacob L. Henrichsen presented promising outcomes for young athletes undergoing hip preservation surgery. The study, conducted at the University of Iowa, analyzed data from both retrospective and prospective cohorts of patients treated with hip arthroscopy, with or without periacetabular osteotomy and distal femoral osteotomy.

The retrospective study found that approximately 50% of patients who underwent hip arthroscopy and periacetabular osteotomy were able to return to sports. However, the prospective study, which isolated patients who had plans to return to sports, saw a significant increase in return-to-sport rates, with around 72% of patients successfully returning to their athletic activities.

Dr. Henrichsen emphasized the importance of these findings, stating, "In our retrospective review, we had about 50% of our patients that underwent hip arthroscopy and [periacetabular osteotomy] PAO [and] were able to return to sport. In our prospective study, however, we were able to isolate the patients who had plans to return to sport and saw a much [more] significant increase in their return to sport rates at around 72%."

The study's outcomes are crucial when counseling young athletes with femoroacetabular impingement, hip dysplasia, and acetabular or femoral aversion issues. As the popularity ofhip arthroscopycontinues to grow, identifying patients who can achieve satisfactory and long-lasting results is becoming increasingly important.

In a related study presented at the meeting, researchers from the Hospital for Special Surgery found that patient outcome scores 6 months after hip arthroscopy were significantly associated with 10-year outcomes and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. The 6-month hip outcome score for activities of daily living, sports subscales, and modified Harris Hip Score were all significantly correlated with long-term outcomes.

The Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting, which took place from May 9-11, 2024, in Boston, brought together leading experts in the field to discuss the latest advancements and research in hip preservation surgery. Dr. Henrichsen's study highlights the potential for these procedures to help young athletes return to their sports and maintain an active lifestyle.