Low Demand for Electric Trucks in Rural Connecticut Despite Ford's Success

Ford's F-150 Lightning is the top-selling all-electric truck in 2023, but dealers in rural Connecticut River Valley report low demand due to range limitations and charging anxiety. The Biden administration plans to impose new tariffs on electric vehicles imported from China to protect domestic manufacturing and jobs.

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Low Demand for Electric Trucks in Rural Connecticut Despite Ford's Success

Low Demand for Electric Trucks in Rural Connecticut Despite Ford's Success

Despite Ford's F-150 Lightning being the top-selling all-electric truck in 2023, with 11,905 sold in the last quarter, dealers in rural Connecticut River Valley are reporting low demand for commercial electric vehicles. The main reasons cited are range limitations and charging anxiety.

Why this matters: The adoption of electric vehicles is crucial for reducing carbon emissions and meeting climate goals, but low demand in rural areas could hinder progress towards a sustainable transportation sector. This trend also has implications for the Biden administration's efforts to promotedomestic electric vehicle manufacturing and protect U.S. jobs.

This development comes as the Biden administration plans to impose new tariffs on electric vehicles imported from China, which could quadruple from the existing 25% to 100%. The tariffs are expected to be announced soon and are part of a broader effort to address concerns over China's manufacturing overcapacity of EVs and other products that pose a threat to U.S. jobs and national security.

The administration's move is seen as a way to protect domestic manufacturing and promote the growth of the U.S. electric vehicle industry, which has received significant investments through the Democrats' Inflation Reduction Act. The tariffs are also expected to cover other products, including semiconductors, solar equipment, and medical supplies.

Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown stated, "Tariffs are not enough. We need to ban Chinese EVs from the US. Period." Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen also expressed concerns, saying, "China is now simply too large for the rest of the world to absorb this enormous capacity. Actions taken by the PRC today can shift world prices."

The Biden administration signed the Inflation Reduction Act into law in August 2022, and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen traveled to Guangzhou and Beijing in early April. The Alliance for American Manufacturing released a report in February stating that the introduction of inexpensive Chinese autos to the American market could be an "extinction-level event" for the U.S. auto sector.

A car model launched by Chinese automaker BYD sells for around $12,000 in China, rivaling U.S.-made EVs that cost three or four times as much. The Biden administration's planned tariffs on Chinese electric vehicles aim to protect the domestic auto industry and address the threat posed by China's manufacturing overcapacity. However, the low demand for commercial electric trucks in rural Connecticut River Valley, despite Ford's success with the F-150 Lightning, highlights the challenges in widespread EV adoption, particularly in areas with range and charging concerns.