Gen Z, Millennials Prefer Email and Messaging Over Phone Calls at Work

A recent survey found that 59% of Gen Zers and millennials prefer email and instant messaging at work, with 50% feeling uncomfortable making business calls due to "phone anxiety." Additionally, 75% of respondents are using AI products at work, citing benefits such as saving time and increasing creativity.

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Bijay Laxmi
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Gen Z, Millennials Prefer Email and Messaging Over Phone Calls at Work

Gen Z, Millennials Prefer Email and Messaging Over Phone Calls at Work

A recentsurvey by Robert Waltersfound that 59% of Gen Zers and millennials prefer to communicate via email and instant messaging at work. The survey also revealed that 50% of respondents feel uncomfortable making business calls due to "phone anxiety."

Why this matters: This shift in communication preferences has significant implications for the way businesses operate and manage their teams, highlighting the need for employers to adapt to the changing expectations of their younger workforce. As technology continues to transform the workplace, understanding these preferences will be crucial for fostering productive and engaged teams.

The findings highlight the changing communication preferences of younger generations in the workplace. As digital natives, Gen Zers and millennials are more accustomed to text-based communication and may find phone conversations more daunting or awkward.

The survey is part of a larger trend of knowledge workers embracing generative AI tools in the workplace. According to a separate survey by Microsoft and LinkedIn involving 31,000 people in 31 countries, 75% of respondents are using AI products at work, with 46% starting to use the technology less than six months ago.

The benefits of using generative AI cited by respondents include saving time (90%), focusing on important work (85%), being more creative (84%), and enjoying work more (83%). However, 52% are reluctant to admit they are using AI for their most important tasks, with 53% worried it will make them look replaceable.

As Microsoft noted, "We've come to the hard part of any tech disruption. Moving past experimentation to business transformation." The rapid adoption of AI tools is reshaping how work gets done, but also raising concerns about job security and the changing nature of roles.

The Robert Walters survey sheds light on the communication preferences and anxieties of Gen Zers and millennials in the workplace. As AI and digital tools continue to transform how we work and interact, employers will need to adapt to the changing expectations and needs of their younger workforce. Finding the right balance of technology and human connection will be key to fostering productive and engaged teams in the years ahead.