Six Chinese Academy of Sciences Members Die in Two Weeks

Six prominent members of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), including five Chinese Communist Party (CCP) members, passed away within a two-week period in April-May 2024, sparking concerns about the impact on China's scientific progress and ambitions to become a world-leading power by 2035. The deceased academicians were experts in various fields, including energy, technology, and innovation, and their loss has significant implications for China's development in these areas." This description focuses on the primary topic of the sudden passing of six CAS members, the main entities involved (CAS and CCP), the context of China's scientific ambitions, and the significant consequences of their loss. It provides objective and relevant details that will guide the AI in creating an accurate visual representation of the article's content.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Six Chinese Academy of Sciences Members Die in Two Weeks

Six Chinese Academy of Sciences Members Die in Two Weeks

In a span of just two weeks, from April 27 to May 9, 2024, six distinguished members of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) passed away due to illness. Five of the deceased academicians were also members of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). The loss of these prominent figures has sent shockwaves through China's scientific community.

Why this matters: The sudden passing of these esteemed academicians raises concerns about the potential impact on China's scientific progress and its ambitions to become a world-leading power by 2035. The loss of their expertise and contributions may have significant implications for China's development in various fields, including energy, technology, and innovation.

The six academicians who died were experts in various scientific fields. Bai Yilong, who passed away on May 9, was an expert in explosives and mechanics. He served as the former deputy director of the Institute of Mechanics of the CAS and the former president of the Chinese Society of Mechanics. Wang Geng, who died on May 8, specialized in electrical machine design and manufacturing. He was involved in the design of the world's first 12,000-kilowatt double water-cooled steam turbine generator and received the National Science and Technology Prize several times.

Chen Jun, known as "the founder of catalytic cracking engineering technology," passed away on May 1. He was an expert in oil refinery engineering technology. Han Zhenxiang, who died on May 4, was an expert in electric power systems and automation. He served as the former president of Zhejiang University from February 1984 to February 1988, a position equivalent to the vice-ministerial level in China. Throughout his career, Han received numerous national and provincial scientific and technological awards.

Wan Huilin, a physical chemist and professor at Xiamen University, died on April 28. Chang Yinfo, a mineral deposit geologist who served as the deputy director, chief engineer, and technical adviser of the Anhui Provincial Bureau of Geology and Mining, passed away on April 27. Chang was awarded the title of "National Outstanding Communist Party Member" when he was alive.

The deaths of these six academicians are part of a larger trend of notable deaths among China's elite over the past three years, including many middle-aged individuals. Since the beginning of 2024, at least 19 academicians in China have died due to illness, 14 of whom were CCP members. In 2023, China reported the deaths of at least 55 academicians, including 16 experts in military and nuclear fields, as well as military doctors. Notable among the deceased were nuclear expert Wu Sheng, nuclear submarine chief designer Zhang Jinlin, and others.

The loss of these six esteemed academicians within such a short period has left a significant void in China's scientific community. Their contributions to their respective fields and to the nation's scientific progress will be remembered and honored. As China continues to invest heavily in science and innovation as part of its ambitions to become a world-leading power by 2035, the legacy of these academicians will undoubtedly inspire future generations of scientists to carry forward their work and push the boundaries of knowledge.

Key Takeaways

  • Six Chinese Academy of Sciences members died in two weeks, sparking concerns for China's scientific progress.
  • Five of the deceased were Chinese Communist Party members, with expertise in fields like energy, technology, and innovation.
  • Their deaths may impact China's ambitions to become a world-leading power by 2035.
  • At least 19 academicians have died in 2024, with 14 being CCP members.
  • In 2023, China reported the deaths of at least 55 academicians, including experts in military and nuclear fields.