Solar Impulse 2 Lands in Tulsa, Continuing Round-the-World Journey

Solar Impulse 2, a solar-powered airplane, landed at Tulsa International Airport on May 12, 2016, after departing from northern California. The aircraft, piloted by Bertrand Piccard, is on a mission to circumnavigate the globe using only solar energy.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Solar Impulse 2 Lands in Tulsa, Continuing Round-the-World Journey

Solar Impulse 2 Lands in Tulsa, Continuing Round-the-World Journey

The Solar Impulse 2, a solar-powered airplane on a mission to circumnavigate the globe, landed at Tulsa International Airport on May 12, 2016, marking another significant milestone in its ambitious journey. The aircraft, piloted by Bertrand Piccard, departed from northern California on May 2 and made a 16-hour stop in Phoenix, Arizona, before continuing on to Tulsa.

The Solar Impulse 2 began its historic voyage in March 2015, taking off from Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Since then, the aircraft has made stops in Oman, Myanmar, China, and Japan before crossing the Pacific Ocean to reach the United States. The journey from Phoenix to Tulsa, which took approximately 16 hours, presented its own challenges, as the plane had been grounded in Arizona for more than a week due to unfavorable weather conditions.

Why this matters: The success of the Solar Impulse 2's round-the-world journey demonstrates the potential for renewable energy to power even the most ambitious endeavors, paving the way for a more sustainable future. As the world grapples with climate change and energy security, innovations like the Solar Impulse 2 offer a beacon of hope for a cleaner, more environmentally friendly tomorrow.

Upon landing in Tulsa, Piccard was greeted by Mayor Dewey Bartlett and a crowd of enthusiastic supporters. The Solar Impulse 2's arrival in Oklahoma marks a significant step forward in its round-the-world journey, which aims to showcase the potential of renewable energy and clean technologies.

The Solar Impulse 2 is a remarkable feat of engineering, powered entirely by solar energy. The aircraft's wings, which span wider than those of a Boeing 747, are covered with more than 17,000 solar cells that power four electric motors. During the day, the solar cells recharge lithium batteries, enabling the plane to fly at night.

The project is the brainchild of Piccard and André Borschberg, who have been working on the Solar Impulse mission since 2003. Their goal is to push the boundaries of what is possible with clean technologies and to inspire people around the world to embrace renewable energy solutions.

As the Solar Impulse 2 continues its journey across the United States, with planned stops in New York and Europe before returning to Abu Dhabi, it serves as a powerful symbol of the potential for innovation and sustainability. The success of this solar-powered aircraft in circumnavigating the globe without using a drop of fossil fuel demonstrates that clean technologies can achieve the impossible and pave the way for a more sustainable future.

Key Takeaways

  • Solar Impulse 2 lands in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on May 12, 2016, in its round-the-world journey.
  • The solar-powered plane began its journey in Abu Dhabi in March 2015, making stops in Asia and the US.
  • The plane is powered by 17,000 solar cells, recharging lithium batteries for nighttime flight.
  • The mission aims to showcase renewable energy and inspire sustainable solutions to climate change.
  • Solar Impulse 2 will continue its journey across the US and Europe, returning to Abu Dhabi.