Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar Introduces Advanced Tools for Proteomics Research

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar introduced advanced analytical tools to discover links between genetic variations, proteins, and diseases. The study, published in Nature Communications, identified 184 protein-altering variants in 137 genes using the Proteograph Product Suite.

author-image
Trim Correspondents
New Update
Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar Introduces Advanced Tools for Proteomics Research

Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar Introduces Advanced Tools for Proteomics Research

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar (WCM-Q) have introduced advanced analytical tools to Qatar, enabling the discovery of links between genetic variations, proteins, and a wide range of diseases. The groundbreaking study, published in Nature Communications, marks a significant milestone in the field of proteomics, the large-scale study of proteins.

Why this matters: This breakthrough in proteomics research has the potential to revolutionize the field of personalized medicine, enabling the development of targeted treatments for a wide range of diseases. As researchers continue to uncover the complex relationships between genetic variations, proteins, and diseases, they may uncover new avenues for disease prevention and treatment, ultimately improving patient outcomes worldwide.

The study utilized the Proteograph Product Suite, a new tool provided by US-based biotechnology company Seer, to quantify over 18,000 different peptides from more than 3,000 proteins in 320 blood samples from a multi-ethnic cohort in Qatar. This tool allows for the identification of links between particular positions on a gene and the presence of a certain amount of a particular protein, known as protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL) mapping.

Dr. Karsten Suhre, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics at WCM-Q, emphasized the importance of understanding the relationships between genes and proteins, stating, "To understand how genetic diseases function, it is not enough to simply identify the genetic variation that causes the disease. We need to know more about how genes direct which proteins are synthesized by the body, in what quantities, and how they function."

The landmark study identified 184 protein-altering variants in 137 genes, which were associated with corresponding variant peptides, providing extra confirmation of the accuracy of their observations. The new Seer tool eliminates some of the problems with alternative proteomics analytical tools, which have a tendency to produce confounding results.

Dr. Frank Schmidt, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Director of the Proteomics Core at WCM-Q, highlighted the impact of this new tool, saying, "This new tool quite radically improves our capacity to understand these relationships between genetic variations and protein expression and helps to build upon Qatar's growing role as a global leader in the exciting and important field of proteomics research."

The study is part of WCM-Q's efforts to establish Qatar as a leader in the field of proteomics research. The development of enhanced proteomics research capacity at WCM-Q is expected to contribute positively to the college's bid to host the 2026 World Congress of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) in Qatar. The research was supported by the Biomedical Research Fund at WCM-Q, a program supported by Qatar Foundation, and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) grant NPRP11C-0115-180010.

The introduction of advanced analytical tools for proteomics research in Qatar represents a significant step forward in understanding the complex relationships between genetic variations, proteins, and diseases. As researchers continue to leverage these cutting-edge technologies, they are paving the way for groundbreaking discoveries that could revolutionize the field of personalized medicine and improve patient outcomes worldwide.

Key Takeaways

  • Researchers at WCM-Q introduced advanced proteomics tools to Qatar, enabling discovery of disease links.
  • New tool can quantify 18,000 peptides from 3,000 proteins in 320 blood samples.
  • Study identified 184 protein-altering variants in 137 genes, confirming accuracy of observations.
  • Breakthrough has potential to revolutionize personalized medicine and improve patient outcomes.
  • Research establishes Qatar as a leader in proteomics, paving way for future discoveries.