Queensland Assault Rate Triples Despite Declining Youth Crime

The assault rate in Queensland has nearly tripled, with the 30-39 age group responsible for 25% of offences. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 8.3 times more likely to be assaulted, highlighting the need for targeted interventions.

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Trim Correspondents
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Queensland Assault Rate Triples Despite Declining Youth Crime

Queensland Assault Rate Triples Despite Declining Youth Crime

The assault rate in Queensland has nearly tripled over the past four years, with the 30-39 age group responsible for nearly 25% of the offences, according to recent government data. This alarming trend persists despite a 26.8% decrease in the youth crime rate over the past nine years, which has reached the lowest level in recorded history.

Nearly three in four victims of crime in Queensland had fallen prey to an assault, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women being severely over-represented. The number of Aboriginal victims of crime more than doubled in two years, from 4,504 to 9,306. "Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 8.3 times more likely to be assaulted than non-Indigenous women," the data reveals.

Why this matters: The sharp contrast between the rising assault rate and the declining youth crime rate emphasizes the necessity for targeted interventions and support for specific age groups and communities. Addressing the disproportionate impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is critical for ensuring the safety and well-being of all Queenslanders.

Despite widespread reports of a 'surge in youth crime', the data shows that the youth crime rate actually fell by 26.8% over nine years, reaching 1,977.4 per 100,000 population in 2024, compared to 2,700 per 100,000 in 2015. The overall crime rate in Queensland has also decreased by 15.4% since 2001, with much of the decline attributable to city areas like Brisbane.

However, the situation remains concerning in outback and northern regions of Queensland. The Northern police district has seen crime worsen over the last 20 years, with outback Queensland recording the highest crime rates in the state.

The data also reveals that most attacks were committed by friends and family members, with only 29% of assaults perpetrated by strangers. This finding underlines the importance of addressing domestic violence and supporting victims within their own communities.

As Queensland's new police commissioner takes office, tackling the assault crisis will be a top priority. The government data provides a clear picture of the challenges ahead, with the 30-39 age group committing nearly a quarter of all assaults and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women facing a significantly higher risk of victimization. Targeted strategies and resources will be essential to curb the violence and ensure the safety of all Queenslanders, particularly the most vulnerable groups.

Key Takeaways

  • Assault rate in Queensland nearly tripled in 4 years, with 30-39 age group responsible for 25%.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women 8.3 times more likely to be assaulted than non-Indigenous women.
  • Youth crime rate fell 26.8% over 9 years, reaching lowest level, despite rising overall assault rate.
  • Most attacks committed by friends/family, underscoring need to address domestic violence.
  • Tackling assault crisis a top priority for new police commissioner, requiring targeted strategies.