Bangladesh Swelters Under Record-Breaking 27-Day Heat Wave in April 2024

Bangladesh experiences its longest heatwave, with temperatures reaching 42.7°C, disrupting daily life and highlighting the severe impacts of climate change on the country.

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Waqas Arain
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Bangladesh Swelters Under Record-Breaking 27-Day Heat Wave in April 2024

Bangladesh Swelters Under Record-Breaking 27-Day Heat Wave in April 2024

Bangladesh is experiencing its longest heat wave in recorded history, with temperatures reaching a scorching 42.7°C (108.9°F) in Chuadanga. The heat wave, which began on March 31, has persisted for an unprecedented 27 consecutive days, surpassing the previous record of 25 days set in 2014. "This April has already seen records of heat wave days in a single year, with nearly 75% of the country experiencing continuous heat waves," stated meteorologists at the Bangladesh Meteorological Department.

The extreme heat conditions have forced school closures and disrupted daily life across the country. The districts of Rajshahi, Chuadanga, and Pabna have been affected particularly severely, while other parts of Bangladesh are also confronting severe to moderate heat wave conditions. Jaminur Rahman, the in-charge of the Chuadanga Meteorological Office, confirmed that the 42.7°C temperature recorded in Chuadanga was the country's highest during this season.

The prolonged heat wave has led to increased discomfort due to rising moisture incursion, with the possibility of rain or thundershowers in parts of Chattogram and Sylhet divisions. Isolated areas may even experience hail. The number of patients suffering from heat-related illnesses has surged at the Chuadanga Sadar Hospital, prompting health officials to advise residents to remain indoors and maintain hydration.

Why this matters: The record-breaking heat wave in Bangladesh highlights the severe impacts of climate change on the country. As one of the nations most vulnerable to the effects of global warming, Bangladesh faces significant challenges in protecting its population and economy from extreme weather events.

Meteorologists attribute the extreme weather conditions to climate change, noting that the capital city of Dhaka has become increasingly difficult to live in during the summer due to declining greenery and water bodies. The Bangladesh Meteorological Department's data shows that both the minimum and maximum temperatures in the country are increasing, with the maximum temperature rising rapidly. The heat wave has disrupted people's lives and livelihoods, especially for low-income groups who have to work under the blazing sun. Experts warn that the heat stress could lead to a 46% reduction in workforce productivity in Bangladesh over the next six decades due to the impacts of global warming.

Key Takeaways

  • Bangladesh experiencing longest heatwave on record, reaching 42.7°C (108.9°F).
  • Heatwave persisted for 27 consecutive days, surpassing previous record of 25 days.
  • Extreme heat disrupted daily life, forced school closures, and increased heat-related illnesses.
  • Meteorologists attribute heatwave to climate change, with rising temperatures and declining greenery.
  • Heatwave could lead to 46% reduction in workforce productivity in Bangladesh over 60 years.