Burgess Creek Wildfire Grows to 50 Hectares Near Williams Lake and Quesnel, BC

A wildfire in British Columbia has grown to 50 hectares, prompting a full response from firefighters. The early start to the season raises concerns about the potential severity of fires due to extremely dry conditions.

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Quadri Adejumo
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Burgess Creek Wildfire Grows to 50 Hectares Near Williams Lake and Quesnel, BC

Burgess Creek Wildfire Grows to 50 Hectares Near Williams Lake and Quesnel, BC

The Burgess Creek wildfire, detected on April 20, 2024, between Williams Lake and Quesnel in British Columbia, has grown to approximately 50 hectares and remains out of control. The BC Wildfire Service (BCWS) has responded with crews, air support, and heavy equipment to the fire, which is highly visible from Highway 97, Quesnel, and Williams Lake areas. No structures are currently threatened by the fire, which is suspected to be human-caused.

The wildfire is located 45 kilometers south of Quesnel and is producing a large column of smoke visible from nearby areas due to high winds. The BCWS has deployed firefighting teams, aircraft, and heavy equipment to combat the out-of-control blaze. Three other smaller fires south of Quesnel are also being monitored and responded to as needed by the BCWS.

Why this matters: The early start to the wildfire season in British Columbia raises concerns about the potential severity of fires this year due to extremely dry conditions. Residents in wildfire-prone areas are being urged to take precautions and be prepared for possible evacuations if fires spread.

The BCWS is encouraging residents to be cautious with campfires and other outdoor burning due to the extremely dry conditions. They advise having necessary tools and water available to fully extinguish any fires. The BCWS has also responded to other smaller fires in the Cariboo Fire Centre area, which have been contained or extinguished.

An investigation into the specific cause of the Burgess Creek wildfire is ongoing, but officials suspect human activity is to blame. "We're seeing an unusually early and dry start to the fire season this year," said BCWS spokesperson Jenna Meyers. "It's critical that people are extra vigilant and cautious when doing any burning or using campfires. One spark is all it takes to start a major wildfire in these conditions." The BCWS continues to monitor and fight the Burgess Creek fire and other smaller blazes in the region, and will provide updates as conditions change.

Key Takeaways

  • Burgess Creek wildfire in BC, 50 hectares, human-caused, out of control.
  • BCWS responded with crews, air support, and equipment to combat the fire.
  • Early start to wildfire season due to extremely dry conditions raises concerns.
  • Residents urged to take precautions and be prepared for possible evacuations.
  • BCWS investigating cause, emphasizing vigilance and caution with outdoor burning.