Canadian Court Lifts No-Contact Order for Freedom Convoy Organizers

A Canadian court lifted a no-contact order between Freedom Convoy organizers Tamara Lich and Chris Barber, allowing them to communicate without lawyers present. Lich still faces multiple charges related to the 2022 Ottawa protests, with her trial expected to set a precedent for future protests.

author-image
Aqsa Younas Rana
New Update
Canadian Court Lifts No-Contact Order for Freedom Convoy Organizers

Canadian Court Lifts No-Contact Order for Freedom Convoy Organizers

A Canadian court has dropped a no-contact order between Freedom Convoy organizers Tamara Lich and Chris Barber, allowing them to communicate and meet without lawyers present. The decision comes despite Lich still facing multiple charges related to the 2022 Ottawa protests, including mischief, obstructing police, counselling others to commit mischief, and intimidation.

Why this matters: The Freedom Convoy protests have had a significant impact on Canadian politics and society, and the ongoing legal proceedings will likely influence the country's approach to protests and demonstrations. The outcome of Lich's trial will also set a precedent for how authorities handle similar events in the future.

The no-contact order was lifted on Wednesday, following the conclusion of the evidence portion of the trial. Lich expressed gratitude for the win, stating,"It's a step in the right direction, and I am grateful for the win. "Despite the dropped no-contact order, Lich's other conditions and no-contact orders remain in place, including a restriction on her communications with other protest organizers.

Lich was initially arrested on February 17, 2022, and was denied bail, while Barber was released. She was held in jail for 18 days before being granted bail. In June 2022, Lich was arrested again for allegedly breaching her prior bail conditions, but those charges were dropped. Her bail conditions were eased in December 2022, allowing her to access her social media account on X (formerly Twitter) for the first time in 22 months.

Chris Barber, a trucker from Saskatchewan, was a key organizer of the convoy along with Lich. He was charged with mischief, obstructing police, and counselling others to commit mischief and intimidation. Barber was released on bail and is awaiting trial next year. On Facebook, Barber posted, "We decided a beer was more deserved than coffee, So grateful." He also shared on X, "In case the butt hurt liberals need more triggering.. still standing. Refuse to lose."

The Public Order Emergency Commission is set to hear testimony from 13 people connected to the Freedom Convoy protest, including Barber, Brigitte Belton, Steeve Charland, Tom Marazzo, Pat King, Benjamin Dichter, James Bauder, Daniel Bulford, and Keith Wilson. Their testimony is expected to provide behind-the-scenes details from the perspective of those who occupied part of Ottawa's downtown during the protest against COVID-19 health measures last winter.

The lifting of the no-contact order between Lich and Barber marks a significant development in the ongoing legal proceedings related to the Freedom Convoy protests. As the trial continues, the testimony of key organizers and participants is expected to shed further light on the events that unfolded in Ottawa in 2022.