Experts Urge Specialized Strangulation Training in Canada's Intimate Partner Violence Cases

Experts call for specialized training on strangulation for professionals in Canada to address this hidden predictor of femicide in intimate partner violence cases.

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Sakchi Khandelwal
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Experts Urge Specialized Strangulation Training in Canada's Intimate Partner Violence Cases

Experts Urge Specialized Strangulation Training in Canada's Intimate Partner Violence Cases

As of April 2024, experts across Canada are calling for specialized training on strangulation for police officers, judges, lawyers, and healthcare workers involved in intimate partner violence (IPV) cases. Strangulation is considered a hidden predictor of femicide, as it often does not leave visible injuries but significantly increases the risk of the victim being killed by their partner.

Researchers and advocates stress the need for professionals in the legal and healthcare systems to receive training on recognizing and properly investigating strangulation. "Strangulation is a key warning sign that someone is at a much higher risk of being killed by their intimate partner," explains a leading expert in the field.

In 2019, the federal government updated the Criminal Code to add strangulation to the definition of assault with a weapon or causing bodily harm. However, experts argue that more training is needed to ensure the law is effectively applied. They also recommend establishing specialized courts for IPV cases and making it mandatory for healthcare workers to report strangulation to police.

Why this matters: Addressing strangulation in IPV cases is vital for preventing further harm and potentially saving lives. By providing specialized training and implementing targeted measures, Canada can take important steps towards protecting victims and holding offenders accountable.

Victims of strangulation face increased health risks, such as strokes and brain injuries, that are not well understood. Advocates are pushing for a national strategy for the prevention of IPV that includes specialized training, harsher sentences for offenders, and support for victims. As of April 2024, this issue remains a pressing concern in Canada's efforts to combat intimate partner violence and ensure the safety of those at risk.

Key Takeaways

  • Experts call for strangulation training for professionals in IPV cases.
  • Strangulation is a hidden predictor of femicide, increasing risk of victim death.
  • Canada updated Criminal Code to include strangulation as assault with a weapon.
  • Advocates push for specialized IPV courts and mandatory healthcare worker reporting.
  • Addressing strangulation in IPV is vital to prevent harm and save lives.