Quebec Company Deep Sky Plans Direct Air Capture Facilities in Canada

Quebec-based Deep Sky plans to build direct air capture facilities in Canada, aiming to create 89,000 jobs by 2050 and position Canada as a leader in carbon capture and storage industry.

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Quebec Company Deep Sky Plans Direct Air Capture Facilities in Canada

Quebec Company Deep Sky Plans Direct Air Capture Facilities in Canada

Deep Sky, a Quebec-based company, has announced plans to establish direct air capture and storage facilities in Canada. The company aims to build a plant in Quebec within the next three years and expand to western Canada, with the potential to create 89,000 jobs by 2050 and position Canada as a leader in the carbon capture and storage industry.

Deep Sky's goal is to develop large-scale, permanent carbon removal projects, particularly in the pulp and paper industry, which represents a significant carbon removal opportunity of up to 130 million tons per year. The company is collaborating with Microsoft and Aker Carbon Capture to address the technological, regulatory, and commercial challenges in the carbon removal market, leveraging their expertise and resources to create a scalable model for deploying these projects quickly to meet global net-zero targets.

Why this matters: Deep Sky's plans are part of a broader effort to scale up carbon removal technologies and achieve global net zero targets. The company's collaboration with industry partners aims to speed up the expansion of carbon removal initiatives in North America, contributing to reaching net-zero emission goals.

Deep Sky has secured $75 million in funding and is testing 10 direct air capture technologies to determine the best fit for Quebec's climate. The company envisions a global multi-trillion dollar industry in carbon removal, and believes Canada could become a leader in the industry. The federal government has announced a tax credit program to support direct air capture projects, which Deep Sky says is vital for the industry's future.

However, experts debate whether direct air capture is the optimal approach, as it is energy-intensive and costly. Other carbon removal methods such as ocean carbon removal and growing plants are also being explored. The International Energy Agency states that direct air capture should not be seen as a substitute for cutting emissions but rather as part of a suite of technology options to achieve climate goals.

The Canadian government has expanded the scope of its Low-Carbon Fuel Procurement Program to include carbon dioxide removal services, aligning with the country's broader vision to emerge as a leader in global climate action. The $135 million program, originally designated for low-carbon fuel initiatives, will now be used to procure permanent carbon removal solutions to help curb the emissions of the Canadian government's transportation fleet.

Deep Sky's Mammoth facility in Iceland is set to be the largest direct air capture and storage facility in the world, designed to capture up to 36,000 tonnes of CO2 per year using renewable energy from a nearby geothermal plant. The company's plans in Canada, along with the government's support for carbon removal technologies, highlight the growing importance of these solutions in achieving net-zero emissions by 2050.

Key Takeaways

  • Quebec-based Deep Sky plans to build direct air capture facilities in Canada, creating 89,000 jobs by 2050.
  • Deep Sky aims to develop large-scale, permanent carbon removal projects, particularly in the pulp and paper industry.
  • Deep Sky is collaborating with Microsoft and Aker Carbon Capture to create a scalable model for carbon removal.
  • The Canadian government is supporting direct air capture projects through a $135 million procurement program.
  • Experts debate the optimal approach, as direct air capture is energy-intensive and costly, with other methods also explored.