India Reassesses Parliament Security After CISF Deployment

India's Ministry of Home Affairs forms a 7-member team to reassess security requirements at the Parliament House Complex in New Delhi. The CISF has taken over various responsibilities, including communication and emergency services, following a security breach in December.

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Nitish Verma
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India Reassesses Parliament Security After CISF Deployment

India Reassesses Parliament Security After CISF Deployment

India's Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) has formed a 7-member team to reassess security requirements at the Parliament House Complex in New Delhi. The move comes after the deployment of over 3,200 Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) personnel to replace Delhi police and Parliament Security Service duties at the complex.

The CISF has taken over various responsibilities, including communication, anti-sabotage, command and control wing, and other emergency services. The committee, led by DIG CISF Ajay Kumar, has been tasked with coordinating with other agencies and submitting a report on security requirements. Specifically, the panel will scrutinize and examine the proposal of the CISF taking over all 16 duties of PSS, such as access regulations for MPs and VIPs, regulation of VIP movement, and other security-related responsibilities.

Why this matters: The reassessment of security requirements at the Parliament House Complex is crucial to prevent future security breaches and ensure the safety of lawmakers and government officials. This move also highlights the need for a comprehensive review of security protocols at sensitive installations across the country to prevent similar incidents.

The reassessment follows a security breach on December 13, when two men walked through three layers of security with smoke canisters concealed in their shoes and sprayed smoke inside the Lok Sabha chamber during Zero Hour. The breach led to the suspension of eight security personnel for lapses. On December 20, the Home Ministry directed the CISF to conduct a security survey.

At least 1,500 CISF personnel, led by a Deputy Inspector General, have been posted to Parliament. The CISF team includes a separate fire unit and will reside in the barracks previously occupied by the CRPF team. The CRPF personnel of the Parliament Duty Group, who were posted to deal with infiltrators, have been withdrawn. Delhi police personnel have also been withdrawn, with only a few remaining posted outside the perimeter.

The CISF is currently working with the PSS to conduct checks and frisk people entering the building. Until further orders, both CISF and PSS will be responsible for access control. Ex-Secretary General P D T Achary stated, "Any change should be under the direction of the Speaker, not MHA." This suggests that the MHA's decision to form a new team and deploy CISF personnel may be seen as an overreach of authority, as the Parliament Security Service works under the Watch and Ward committee under the Lok Sabha Secretariat.

The CISF, with a strength of around 200,000 personnel, provides security to airports, metro stations, and at least 356 sensitive installations, including coal mines, nuclear and power plants. The CISF's VIP protection unit also provides Z plus security cover to high-profile individuals. The team's report will help identify additional security personnel requirements to make the arrangement full proof and prevent future security breaches at the Parliament House Complex.

Key Takeaways

  • India's MHA forms 7-member team to reassess Parliament House Complex security.
  • CISF takes over security duties from Delhi police and Parliament Security Service.
  • Team to review security requirements, including CISF taking over 16 PSS duties.
  • Reassessment follows December security breach, highlighting need for review.
  • CISF to work with PSS for access control until further orders.