Russia Accuses US of Meddling in India's 2024 Elections

Russia accuses the US of interfering in India's 2024 general elections, which the US State Department denies. The allegations come amid tensions between the US and Russia, and concerns over foreign influence in democratic processes.

author-image
Bijay Laxmi
New Update
Russia Accuses US of Meddling in India's 2024 Elections

Russia Accuses US of Meddling in India's 2024 Elections

Russia has alleged that the United States is interfering in India's 2024 general elections, a claim that the US State Department has firmly denied. The accusation comes amid heightened tensions between the two nations and growing concerns over foreign influence in democratic processes.

Why this matters: The allegations of foreign interference in India's elections have significant implications for the country's sovereignty and the integrity of its democratic processes. Moreover, the involvement of major world powers like the US, Russia, China, and Pakistan in Indian politics could have far-reaching consequences for regional and global geopolitics.

On Thursday, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson Maria Zakharova accused the US of attempting to "complicate" India's upcoming elections and interfere in its internal affairs. Zakharova claimed that the US had not provided "reliable evidence" to support allegations of Indian citizens' involvement in a plot to murder pro-Khalistan activist Gurpatwant Singh Pannun on American soil.

In response, State Department spokesperson Matthew Miller firmly denied any US involvement in the Indian elections, stating: "With respect to the first, no, of course we don't involve ourselves in elections in India, just as we don't involve ourselves in elections anywhere in the world. Those are decisions for the people of India to make."

Regarding the assassination plot against Pannun, Miller pointed to an existing public indictment but noted that its details are part of an ongoing legal process, which restricts public comment. "There is a publicly-returned indictment that contains alleged facts. They're allegations until they're proven before a jury that anyone can go and read," Miller explained.

Russia's criticisms also extended to the US Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF), which recommended classifying India as a 'country of particular concern' in its annual report for the fifth time. Zakharova accused the US of harboring a "neo-colonial mentality," suggesting that the report made "unfounded accusations" against the Indian government and reflected Washington's lack of respect for India's sovereignty and historical context.

While the US denies any interference, experts suggest that other countries, such as Pakistan and China, may prefer Prime Minister Narendra Modi not to come to power again due to economic and ideological reasons. Pramit Pal Chaudhuri, India practice head at Eurasia Group, stated:"Pakistan and potentially China would prefer Modi to not come to power again... Indian intelligence officials who have worked on China have told me that the Chinese are not all that happy with him."

The US State Department's response underscores the ongoing complexities in US-Russia relations and the sensitive nature of US-India diplomacy. As legal proceedings related to the Pannun case continue, observers remain attentive to how these allegations will affect diplomatic relations and the broader geopolitical landscape.