Indonesian Attorney General's Office to Reopen Five Smelters in Tin Trading Corruption Case

The Indonesian government plans to reopen seized tin smelters despite ongoing illegal mining and corruption in the industry, raising concerns about the effectiveness of legal actions.

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Mazhar Abbas
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Indonesian Attorney General's Office to Reopen Five Smelters in Tin Trading Corruption Case

Indonesian Attorney General's Office to Reopen Five Smelters in Tin Trading Corruption Case

The Indonesian Attorney General's Office has announced plans to reopen five smelters that were previously seized in connection with a tin trading corruption case in the Bangka Belitung Islands. The case, which exposed corruption related to tin management in the mining business license (IUP) area of PT Timah from 2015 to 2022, resulted in state losses of IDR 271 trillion.

Despite the exposure of the corruption case, illegal tin mining activities continue to take place around fishing villages in Pangkal Pinang City, according to local residents and authorities. While some raids have temporarily halted the illegal mining, workers eventually return when the situation calms down.

Why this matters: The ongoing issue of illegal tin mining in the Bangka Belitung Islands highlights the challenges faced by Indonesian authorities in combating corruption and environmental damage in the mining sector. The reopening of the seized smelters raises questions about the effectiveness of legal actions taken against those involved in the corruption case.

The Acting Governor of Bangka Belitung claims that the disclosure of the tin corruption case has significantly reduced environmental damage, but acknowledges that there are still rogue individuals carrying out illegal mining. The Director of the Bangka Belitung Resources Institute suggests that the Attorney General's Office should not be satisfied with the cases already exposed and should provide certainty on whether there will be other suspects or if the legal process will continue to the next stage.

"The disclosure of this corruption case has not had a strong deterrent effect, as illegal tin mining activities continue to take place around fishing villages in Pangkal Pinang City," a local resident confirmed. Authorities have conducted raids to halt the illegal mining, but workers often return when the situation settles.

Key Takeaways

  • Indonesia plans to reopen 5 smelters seized in tin corruption case.
  • Corruption case exposed $18B in state losses, but illegal mining continues.
  • Authorities struggle to curb illegal mining despite corruption exposure.
  • Reopening of smelters raises concerns about legal actions' effectiveness.
  • Locals confirm corruption case had little deterrent effect on illegal mining.