Denmark Outpaces Ireland in Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials

Ireland lags behind Denmark and Finland in conducting industry-sponsored clinical trials, with a significant decline in trials since 2021, highlighting the need for a streamlined and efficient clinical trial process to attract more research and provide patients with access to life-saving treatments." This description focuses on the primary topic of clinical trials, the main entities involved (Ireland, Denmark, Finland, and the Irish Pharmaceutical Healthcare Association), the context of the clinical trial landscape, and the significant implications for public health and the economy. The description also provides objective and relevant details that will guide the AI in creating an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the comparison between countries, the decline in trials, and the need for reform.

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Nitish Verma
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Denmark Outpaces Ireland in Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials

Denmark Outpaces Ireland in Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials

Denmark has conducted nearly three times more industry-sponsored clinical trials than Ireland between 2014 and 2023, according to the 2024 Clinical Trials Performance Report. The report, published by the Irish Pharmaceutical Healthcare Association (IPHA), reveals that Denmark carried out 1,290 trials during this period, while Ireland conducted 460. Finland, another European country with a similar population to Ireland, performed 661 trials.

Why this matters: The disparity in clinical trials between Denmark and Ireland has significant implications for the development of new medicines and access to life-saving treatments for patients. A streamlined and efficient clinical trial process is crucial for attracting industry-sponsored research, which can have a direct impact on public health and the economy.

In Ireland, oncology dominated the clinical trial landscape, accounting for 42% of the trials conducted between 2014 and 2023. Neurology, gastroenterology, immunology, and respiratory combined represented just over a quarter of the trials. The report also shows that 68% of industry-led studies in Ireland are Phase 3 trials.

However, all three countries have experienced a significant decline in clinical trials since 2021. Ireland saw a drop of more than 40% in the number of all-industry sponsored interventional clinical trials in 2022 compared to 2021. Dr. Rebecca Cramp, IPHA director of regulatory affairs, emphasized the need for a predictable, transparent, and efficient clinical research system to attract more clinical trials to Ireland.

The IPHA has developed a new standardized clinical trial agreement to reduce delays and costs, but further collaboration among stakeholders, including the Government, hospitals, academic institutions, and industry, is required to reform the clinical trial process. The association has called for several actions to accelerate the development of new medicines, such as standardized clinical trial start-up requirements and timelines for hospitals, specific clinical trial signatories and a standardized sign-off process, the appointment of one permanent clinical research nurse post for each teaching hospital, and ring-fencing of clinical trial funding and dedicated clinical research time for staff.

By implementing these reforms, Ireland aims to increase its attractiveness for clinical trials and provide patients with access to life-saving treatments. The 2024 Clinical Trials Performance Report serves as a wake-up call for Ireland to streamline its clinical trial processes and collaborate more effectively to compete with countries like Denmark in attracting industry-sponsored clinical research.

Key Takeaways

  • Denmark conducted 1,290 clinical trials between 2014-2023, while Ireland conducted 460.
  • Oncology dominated Ireland's clinical trials, accounting for 42% of total trials.
  • Ireland saw a 40% drop in industry-sponsored clinical trials in 2022 compared to 2021.
  • IPHA developed a standardized clinical trial agreement to reduce delays and costs.
  • Ireland aims to increase attractiveness for clinical trials by streamlining processes and collaboration.