Ireland Approves Abemaciclib, Cutting Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk by 30%

Ireland's Health Service Executive (HSE) has approved abemaciclib, a groundbreaking breast cancer treatment that reduces the risk of recurrence by 30% for high-risk oestrogen-driven breast cancer patients, offering new hope for thousands of women worldwide. The drug, manufactured by Eli Lilly, will be available from June 1 and marks a significant milestone in enhancing treatment options for eligible patients in Ireland." This description focuses on the primary topic of the article (approval of abemaciclib), the main entities involved (HSE, Eli Lilly, and breast cancer patients), the context (Ireland), and the significant action and implication (reducing recurrence risk and offering new hope for patients). The description also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the drug's manufacturer and the country where it will be available.

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Ireland Approves Abemaciclib, Cutting Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk by 30%

Ireland Approves Abemaciclib, Cutting Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk by 30%

Ireland's Health Service Executive (HSE) has approved abemaciclib, a groundbreaking breast cancer treatment that reduces the risk of recurrence by 30% for high-risk oestrogen-driven breast cancer patients. The drug, which will be available from June 1, marks a significant milestone in enhancing treatment options for eligible patients in Ireland.

Why this matters: The approval of abemaciclib has significant implications for the treatment of breast cancer, offering new hope for patients with high-risk oestrogen-driven breast cancer. This breakthrough could lead to improved survival rates and better quality of life for thousands of women worldwide.

Abemaciclib, manufactured by Eli Lilly, will be administered as a tablet to eligible patients for a duration of two years. The drug targets the main known mechanism of resistance, allowing anti-hormone therapy to work more effectively and reducing the risk of relapse by nearly a third. It is estimated that abemaciclib can be used to treat approximately 70% of breast cancer cases in Ireland.

Professor Janice Walshe, UCD clinical professor and consultant medical oncologist, hailed the approval as a "significant milestone" that enhances treatment options for eligible patients. "From our point of view, we're just very keen to get access to this for our patients because, ultimately, it's going to reduce the risk of disease relapse, which in itself makes sense for the taxpayer," Professor Walshe said.

The Irish Cancer Society has welcomed the approval, calling for "accelerated access to these life-changing medicines, which give cancer patients hope, better quality of life and better cancer survival." Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, with one in seven women diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime. In Ireland, there are 3,700 new cases of breast cancer diagnosed each year.

The European Medicines Agency approved abemaciclib two years ago, and the drug has been used in the UK for over a year. Breast Cancer Ireland first applauded the breakthrough five years ago when Eli Lilly announced the results of its CDK4 & 6 inhibitor Verzenio (abemaciclib) trial.

The approval of abemaciclib in Ireland represents a significant step forward in the fight against breast cancer, offering hope and improved outcomes for high-risk patients. With its ability to reduce the risk of recurrence by 30%, this groundbreaking treatment has the potential to transform the lives of many women battling oestrogen-driven breast cancer.

Key Takeaways

  • Ireland's HSE approves abemaciclib, a breast cancer treatment reducing recurrence risk by 30%.
  • Abemaciclib targets the main mechanism of resistance, allowing anti-hormone therapy to work more effectively.
  • The drug can be used to treat approximately 70% of breast cancer cases in Ireland.
  • Abemaciclib will be available in Ireland from June 1, marking a significant milestone in breast cancer treatment.
  • The treatment has the potential to transform the lives of many women battling oestrogen-driven breast cancer.