Taoiseach Simon Harris Attends National Famine Commemoration in Longford

Irish Taoiseach Simon Harris and Minister Catherine Martin will attend the National Famine Commemoration in Edgeworthstown, Longford, on May 19, 2024, to honor the victims of the Great Famine, a poignant reminder of Ireland's history and cultural heritage, particularly in the wake of the closure of the Great Hunger Museum in the US." This description focuses on the primary topic (National Famine Commemoration), main entities (Taoiseach Simon Harris, Minister Catherine Martin, and the Great Hunger Museum), context (Edgeworthstown, Longford, and Ireland's history), and significant actions (commemoration and museum closure). It also provides objective and relevant details that will help an AI generate an accurate visual representation of the article's content, such as the setting, participants, and historical significance of the event.

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Taoiseach Simon Harris Attends National Famine Commemoration in Longford

Taoiseach Simon Harris Attends National Famine Commemoration in Longford

On Sunday, May 19, 2024, Irish Taoiseach Simon Harris will attend the National Famine Commemoration in Edgeworthstown, Longford, accompanied by Minister Catherine Martin. The event, scheduled to take place at 12pm at The Green in Edgeworthstown, will feature military honours and a wreath laying ceremony to remember those who suffered or perished during the Famine.

This will be Taoiseach Simon Harris' first visit to Longford since taking office. The ceremony serves as a poignant reminder of the country's history and pays tribute to the victims of the Famine, which claimed the lives of 1.1 million people in Ireland.

Why this matters: The National Famine Commemoration highlights the importance of remembering and learning from Ireland's past, particularly in the face of cultural heritage losses like the closure of the Great Hunger Museum. By honoring the victims of the Famine, the Irish government is acknowledging the ongoing impact of this traumatic event on the country's identity and development.

The importance of remembering the Great Famine, a central event in Ireland's modern history, has been underscored by the recent disappearance of Ireland's Great Hunger Museum at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut. The museum, which was dedicated to the memory of the Famine and housed the world's largest collection of related visual art, artifacts, and printed materials, closed in 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic and did not reopen.

Despite efforts by a group of Irish American scholars and activists to raise funds and develop a strategic plan to save the museum, the university rejected the proposal. The collection, curated by art historian Niamh O'Sullivan and featuring works by renowned artists such as Jack B. Yeats and Rowan Gillespie, is currently in storage without professional care.

The National Famine Commemoration in Edgeworthstown takes on added significance in light of the museum's closure. As Ireland continues to grapple with the legacy of the Famine, events like this provide an opportunity for the nation to come together in remembrance and reflection. The presence of Taoiseach Simon Harris and Minister Catherine Martin underscores the government's commitment to honoring the memory of those who suffered during this tragic period in Irish history.

Key Takeaways

  • Taoiseach Simon Harris to attend National Famine Commemoration in Edgeworthstown, Longford on May 19, 2024.
  • Event to feature military honours and wreath laying ceremony to remember Famine victims.
  • This is Harris' first visit to Longford since taking office.
  • Great Hunger Museum in Connecticut closed in 2020 and its collection is in storage.
  • National Famine Commemoration highlights importance of remembering Ireland's past.