Malta's Shadow Health Minister Slams PBS for Biased Coverage of President's Appointment

Allegations of bias at Malta's public broadcaster PBS raise concerns about media freedom, as the shadow health minister accuses it of being a government mouthpiece and calls for reforms.

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Nimrah Khatoon
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Malta's Shadow Health Minister Slams PBS for Biased Coverage of President's Appointment

Malta's Shadow Health Minister Slams PBS for Biased Coverage of President's Appointment

Adrian Delia, Malta's shadow health minister, has strongly criticized the national broadcaster PBS for its partisan coverage of the appointment of Myriam Spiteri Debono as the country's 11th president. Despite the unanimous parliamentary vote to appoint Spiteri Debono, Delia expressed anger that PBS only invited exponents from the ruling Labour Party to comment on the event.

Delia argues that PBS, which is funded by taxpayers, has become a propaganda outlet for the government, often found in breach of balance by the Broadcasting Authority. "PBS has failed in its duty to provide impartial coverage and give a voice to all citizens who pay for the service through their taxes," Delia stated. He accused the broadcaster of portraying a thriving and prosperous nation while silencing uncomfortable truths and the struggles faced by the Maltese people.

Why this matters: The allegations of bias at PBS raise concerns about the state of media freedom and impartiality in Malta. As a publicly funded broadcaster, PBS has a responsibility to provide balanced coverage and represent the diverse views of the population, regardless of political affiliations.

The shadow health minister emphasized that balance is not just about reporting the opposition's views, but about giving a platform to all citizens to voice their concerns and hold those in power accountable. Delia called for reforms at PBS to ensure it fulfills its mandate as a public service broadcaster and reflects the reality of life in Malta, rather than serving as a mouthpiece for the government.

In response to the criticism, a PBS spokesperson stated that the broadcaster is committed to impartial journalism and denies any bias in its coverage. The spokesperson noted that PBS has invited opposition figures to comment on various issues in the past and will continue to strive for balanced reporting in the future.

Key Takeaways

  • Shadow health minister criticizes PBS for partisan coverage of presidential appointment.
  • Delia accuses PBS of being a propaganda outlet for the government, silencing uncomfortable truths.
  • Allegations of bias at PBS raise concerns about media freedom and impartiality in Malta.
  • Delia calls for reforms to ensure PBS fulfills its mandate as a public service broadcaster.
  • PBS denies bias, claims to invite opposition figures and strive for balanced reporting.