Fatah Accuses Hamas of Making Excuses to Reject PLO Unity

The Fatah-Hamas divide deepens as they clash over strategies, with Fatah accusing Hamas of pursuing self-preservation over Palestinian goals. Hamas open to ceasefire and statehood, but Fatah remains skeptical of their intentions.

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Muthana Al-Najjar
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Fatah Accuses Hamas of Making Excuses to Reject PLO Unity

Fatah Accuses Hamas of Making Excuses to Reject PLO Unity

The Fatah movement has accused the Hamas leadership of pursuing policies that have led to Israel regaining control of the Gaza Strip. Fatah claims that Hamas is seeking to join the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) only to preserve itself and survive, rather than to achieve the goals of the October 7 attack in Palestine.

The two Palestinian factions, Fatah and Hamas, have significant differences that have not been reconciled despite recent meetings between their representatives. Fatah has criticized Hamas for its actions on October 7, 2023, saying they were not coordinated with other groups and only worsened the situation for the Palestinian people.

In an interview with the Associated Press (AP), a senior Hamas political official, Khalil al-Hayya, revealed that Hamas is open to a ceasefire with Israel for a minimum of five years, and would disarm and turn into a political party if an independent Palestinian state is established along the pre-1967 borders. Al-Hayya expressed Hamas's desire to join the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) led by the Fatah movement to establish a unified government for Gaza and the West Bank.

Al-Hayya stated that Hamas would accept a fully sovereign Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and the return of Palestinian refugees in accordance with international resolutions. He denied Israeli accusations that Hamas is not serious about a prisoner-captive exchange, and emphasized that Hamas would not back down from its demands for a permanent ceasefire and full withdrawal of Israeli troops.

The Hamas official also warned that the group would target any non-Palestinian military presence in Gaza, and affirmed that Hamas does not regret carrying out Operation Al-Aqsa Flood, refuting claims that Hamas fighters targeted civilians during the assaults.

Why this matters: The ongoing tensions between Fatah and Hamas highlight the deep divisions within the Palestinian leadership and the challenges in achieving a unified front in negotiations with Israel. The accusations and differing positions of the two factions underscore the complexity of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the obstacles to reaching a lasting peace agreement.

Despite Hamas's recent statements indicating a willingness to accept a Palestinian state within the pre-1967 borders and join the PLO, Fatah remains skeptical of the group's intentions. "Hamas is seeking to join the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) only to preserve itself and survive, rather than to achieve the goals of the October 7 attack in Palestine," a Fatah spokesperson said. The future of Palestinian unity and the prospects for a negotiated settlement with Israel remain uncertain as the two main factions continue to clash over their strategies and objectives.

Key Takeaways

  • Fatah accuses Hamas of policies leading to Israel regaining Gaza control.
  • Hamas open to ceasefire, disarmament if independent Palestinian state established.
  • Hamas seeks to join PLO to preserve itself, not achieve Oct 7 attack goals.
  • Ongoing Fatah-Hamas tensions highlight divisions in Palestinian leadership.
  • Fatah skeptical of Hamas's intentions despite its willingness to join PLO.