600-Year-Old Artifacts Discovered During Warsaw Metro Construction

Archaeologists uncover 600-year-old artifacts in Warsaw, offering insights into medieval domestic life. Pottery, animal bones, and a sharpening stone found in garbage pits reveal the city's history and culture.

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Wojciech Zylm
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600-Year-Old Artifacts Discovered During Warsaw Metro Construction

600-Year-Old Artifacts Discovered During Warsaw Metro Construction

Archaeologists have uncovered a trove of 600-year-old artifacts during the construction of the Warsaw Metro, providing fascinating insights into domestic life in the city between the 14th and 16th centuries. The excavation site, located in Warsaw's historic center, yielded pottery fragments, animal bones, and a sharpening stone, all found in medieval garbage pits.

The pottery pieces range from ordinary kitchen wares to more decorative items likely used for special occasions. Archaeologists were able to date the finds to the 14th-16th centuries, with one pit specifically dated to the 15th century during the reign of King Władysław Jagiełło. "The pottery fragments include both ordinary kitchen items and more decorated pieces likely used for special occasions," said lead archaeologist Magdalena Wróblewska.

In addition to the pottery, the excavation also revealed the remains of a settlement cottage and two garbage pits. The discovery is expected to yield further insights into the diet and daily life of the people living in Warsaw centuries ago once the contents of the pottery are analyzed. "The findings, which include the remains of historic dishes, will allow archaeologists to further study the diet and daily life of people in late medieval Warsaw," Wróblewska explained.

Why this matters: The discovery of these 600-year-old artifacts offers a rare glimpse into the everyday lives of Warsaw's inhabitants during the late medieval period. By studying these archaeological finds, researchers can gain a deeper understanding of the city's history, culture, and the way people lived centuries ago.

The larger pottery fragments will be reconstructed and displayed at the State Archaeological Museum, allowing the public to appreciate these historical treasures. Wróblewska noted, "The larger fragments will be reconstructed and displayed at the State Archaeological Museum." The findings highlight the importance of archaeological excavations in urban areas, which can uncover valuable information about a city's past and help researchers better understand the lives of its historical inhabitants.

Key Takeaways

  • Archaeologists uncovered 600-year-old artifacts in Warsaw, Poland.
  • Finds include pottery, animal bones, and a sharpening stone from 14th-16th centuries.
  • Artifacts provide insights into domestic life and diet in medieval Warsaw.
  • Larger pottery fragments will be reconstructed and displayed at a museum.
  • Excavations in urban areas can uncover valuable historical information.